I was dine (I was dyin')

jacdac

Senior Member
Lebanese
‘Felt like I was dine,’ Alvin Rutledge told Leandro. Rutledge was a long-haul trucker, currently unemployed, who lived in Bangor. His grandfather was Dave Rutledge, a lifelong Haven resident. ‘What exactly do you mean?’ Leandro asked.

Source: The Tommyknockers by Stephen King

What does the bolded expression mean?
This scene is taking at a Tavern in Bangor. It is a conversation between the journalist Leandro and the trucker Alvin about his recent experience driving to the neighbouring town Haven. When Leandro asked him what he means, he replied and I quote:

‘Heart beatin’ too fast. Headache. Felt like I was gonna puke my guts out. I did puke, as a matter of fact. Just ’fore I turned around. Rolled down the window and just let her fly into the slipstream, I did.’


Thank you.
 
  • Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    My guess is that Alvin actually said, "Felt like I was dyin' (as in dying)." Why it would be spelled that way, I can't say.

    cross-posted
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    My guess is that Alvin actually said, "Felt like I was dyin' (as in dying)." Why it would be spelled that way, I can't say.
    "Dyin'" is two syllables. Some people say it as one syllable "dine" (I suppose you could spell it "dyn" but that might be even more mysterious. ;))
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    That makes sense. Perhaps it's just that I pronounce dyin' and even dying with only syllable (more or less like daing - with a diphthong, rather than two syllables), so I considered dyin' and dine to be perfectly homophonous.
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Western Washington. We've got (or I've got) a strange mix of accents. There's a fair amount of Californian, some upper-Midwestern and a smattering of whichever dialect includes "Warshington" or "warsh the dishes" - I don't pronounce those words that way, but I've known long-time Washingtonians (Warshingtonians) who do.
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    It's probably somewhere between the two. I can actually hear a difference between my own pronunciations of dine and dyin', but it's pretty minimal. If I speak dyin' slowly, it's more obviously two syllables, but at normal speed, it's something like one and a half syllables. I've been looking at IPA documentation for diphthongs, but I can't quite find how to express it.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Western Washington. We've got (or I've got) a strange mix of accents. There's a fair amount of Californian, some upper-Midwestern and a smattering of whichever dialect includes "Warshington" or "warsh the dishes" - I don't pronounce those words that way, but I've known long-time Washingtonians (Warshingtonians) who do.
    Iowans talk like that. I used to have friends who lived in "Warshington" IA.
     
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