I was not much concerned, till, upon some unlucky thing I said [DeFoe]

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enkidu68

Senior Member
turkish
Enkidu: Hi, I was reading this part from the novel by Daniel Defoe
Could you simplify or explain what I dont understand please?


Defoe's part: I was not much concerned at the disaster, though I saw my master, after

having been wounded by a splinter in the head during the engagement,

very barbarously used by the Turks
; (Enkidu: what is that was used, splinter? If it is, it does not make any sense, because it was not a gun or spear something only part of a spear, right?) I say, I was not much concerned,

till,(Enkidu: till refers to “they took..”?) upon some unlucky thing I said, which, as I remember, was about

abusing my master,
they took me and beat me most unmercifully with a

flat stick on the soles of my feet, so that I could neither go or stand

for several days together.

Enkidu: what did he see? Why wasn't he concerned before, and what happened he got concerned later?
thank you for your help.
 
  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    The 'splinter' is a piece of wood coming off a spear perhaps. Till is from until and it is not in the text you provided. So perhaps he wasn't concerned until he saw his master...???
    Your post is welcome but very confusing and hard to understand. It would be better if you posted the citation from the novel separate from your thoughts and questions. Just the lines from the novel as they appear in the book.
    Then post your questions underneath in a separate paragraph. Bold print is not necessary nor particularly desired, not is double spacing.
     

    enkidu68

    Senior Member
    turkish
    This is from Captain Singleton.
    here is the
    original text:

    "I was not much concerned at the disaster, though I saw my master, after having been wounded by a splinter in the head during the engagement, very barbarously used by the Turks; I say, I was not much concerned, till upon some unlucky thing I said, which, as I remember, was about abusing my master, they took me and beat me most unmercifully with a flat stick on the soles of my feet, so that I could neither go or stand for several days together"


    < Edited to simplify formatting. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    When you ask about a quotation you should tell us in your own words something about what was happening. Who is speaking? What happened before this? What is the 'disaster'? And so on.

    Since we don't know what the 'disaster' was, we can't explain the splinter any better than BlueGlaze does above.

    The narrator was not concerned by what was happening to other people --- whatever it was --- until he said something and the Turks started beating him. When he was being hurt, he became concerned [=worried, upset].
     

    BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I wasn't concerned until I said something that upset my captors; then I was concerned. That is when they tortured me.
    The splinter, as I said before, is generally a small piece of wood that broke off a bigger piece of wood which could have come from a spear.
    He saw his master after he was wounded by the splinter. Evidently he felt his master was OK but he became concerned when he
    asked about his master and they started torturing him. Enkidu, I hope I answered your original questions. The second posting was much, much better.
    If you have further questions, please ask.
    You are always welcome here.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I don't have much to add to what BLUEGLAZE has said.

    The text doesn't tell us exactly what the splinter was, but sometimes when a ship was under attack a large splinter of wood from a broken mast could wound or kill someone. I think it could also have meant a fragment of a shell - whatever shells were used at that time.

    He was not very upset by the ship being attacked, nor even by his master's injury, but when he was overheard making some remark about the way the Turks had then treated his master, he was subjected to the very painful bastinado - and that punishment did upset him of course.
     

    enkidu68

    Senior Member
    turkish
    Thank you so much for your prompt answers.
    THey shed light on me:))
    so can we say that "Singleton was not concerned until he heard something (which was done to his master)
    is it that you are saying?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    No, you should read it as: "I was not much concerned [...] till [...] they took me and beat me..."
     
    Last edited:

    enkidu68

    Senior Member
    turkish
    Enkidu: Hi again,
    I am citing another complex sentence from the Captain Singleton.


    Defoe: As I was not much concerned at my captivity, not indeed understanding the consequences of it, if it had continued, so I was not suitably sensible of my deliverance; nor, indeed, was it so much a deliverance to me as it would otherwise have been, for my master, who was the only friend I had in the world, died at Lisbon of his wounds;


    enkidu: my version would be "it did not seem to me deliverence because my only friend (my master) died at Lisbon because of his wonds, same?
    Can you simplify this part to me?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Returning to "splinter". The text dates the engagement with an Algerian man of war to "about the year 1695", a time when ships fought with cannon. Wounds from splinters were common, and the splinters were pieces of wood splintered from the ship's structure by cannonball impacts. They were not, generally, small pieces of wood in the modern sense of a splinter which pricks ones finger, but large, ragged, sharp pieces of wood travelling with some speed and causing severe injuries.
     
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