I was sat with my girlfriend

Inversuz

Senior Member
russian
I have come across this sentence (the context is: they went to the cinema for a movie, youtube video):

"I was sat with my girlfriend ..."

Is that such a colloquial grammar (I have read that it is becoming the 'standard' version in BrE), or is it just the passive in this case (he was sat on the place by a staff member of the cinema)?

Is this the proper sentence in the context above?
"I was seated with my girlfriend."
 
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  • Ikwik64

    Senior Member
    British English, originally Australian
    It is essentially a Northern British locution, and remains much more common in that part of the country.
    You're right. I live in Yorkshire, which has a few grammatical features all of its own. "Was sat" is evidently of them. :thumbsup:
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Ikwik is right in saying that it is common in informal English, but it is not, I think, about to take over. It is essentially a Northern British locution, and remains much more common in that part of the country.
    Agreed, but it has migrated south over the last few years. I never use it and it irritates me when I hear it...

    This has been discussed in previous threads, by the way.

    Here's one:

    Sat and sitting, stood and standing
     

    DonnyB

    Member Emeritus
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I hear it a lot, and use it. I've even on occasion been known to say "I was sat sitting ...".

    I wouldn't recommend it for use in a test or exam except perhaps a piece of dialogue, but there's nothing wrong with it otherwise in BE.
     

    lorelord

    Senior Member
    UK - english
    I come from the deep south of England - Kent and have no problem with it. However it doesnt seem a complete sentence to me and therefore the choice of "Was Sat", "Sitting" or just "Sat" may depend on what follows.
     

    nightowl666

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I think it is grammatical, but not as frequently used as "sitting".
    Please look at the sample sentences below from English publications:

    1. Ted Boorman could spend hours sat on the patio watching the marvelous farm he had created.

    Francesco Buscemi, From Body Fuel to Universal Poison,2017, p 93

    2. I would spend hours sat in the shop's back kitchen, drawing pictures, left to amuse ourselves.

    Andy Woodward, Position of Trust, 2019

    3. Ellie would spend hours sat against her prison window desperately trying to hold on to some sort of sanity.

    Stephen J. Holloway, Ellie, 2018, p 177

    4. He spent hours sat up in the fields, back against the wall in more ways than one.

    Irene Gough, An Autobiography of a Nobody, 2012, p 322
     
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    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's not grammatical/idiomatic in U.S. English. "Sitting" is the only form we use there.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    That's what I meant. :) You won't find any examples here, but you will find some there.
     

    Aguas Claras

    Senior Member
    UK English
    When I was a child (in the north of England), it was common in spoken English but considered incorrect in written English. However, I've noticed over recent years that newspapers and so on use it fairly frequently, so it seems to have become accepted. Same goes for "stood" instead of standing (e.g "he was stood at the bus stop"). Don't like it at all but there you go. :(
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    You won't find any examples here, but you will find some there.
    By "there" I assume you mean in BE. Odd, isn't it? We are often told that AE preserves forms that have gone from BE (eg gotten), but it seems not this one.
    1609 W. Shakespeare Louers Complaint in Sonnets sig. K2v Hee againe desires her, being satte.
    1711 J. Addison Spectator No. 122. ¶6 The Court was sat before Sir Roger came.
    Examples from the OED :)
     

    nightowl666

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    When I was a child (in the north of England), it was common in spoken English but considered incorrect in written English. However, I've noticed over recent years that newspapers and so on use it fairly frequently, so it seems to have become accepted. Same goes for "stood" instead of standing (e.g "he was stood at the bus stop"). Don't like it at all but there you go. :(
    Yes,a parallel phenomenon for the usage of "stood", according to Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage, 4th Ed. 2015.
    Fowler's dictionary indicates that "sat" is the same as "seated".
    Regarding the use of "sat", the Dictionary also says: "For many people from a large part of the North and part of the West of England, it continues to be the normal formulation, and they might well be offended to hear it described as ‘dialect’. What has changed is that, as the OEC data suggests, its use has spread well beyond its traditional regional confines; though still a predominantly British construction, it is also found in other varieties, including AmE, Australian, NZ, and Irish English. Unsurprisingly, it appears above all in texts classified by the OEC as not being formal or technical, especially in blogs, news, and sports writing. Many of the British newspaper examples are from Northern papers, often directly quoting what people said. However, even a paper as starchy as the Telegraph occasionally slips it in."
     
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