I wear/use glasses to read

fangoso

Senior Member
spanish-Venezuela
Hello eveyone;

So, just a little doubt that I have here. I know we wear glasses but I was wondering if we can say we "use" glasses in the case we are specifying their use like in the sentence above.

That's all. Thanks in advance.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Either of those can be used, in my view, although they seem to throw up surprisingly few hits if you google them.

    It's perhaps more usual to talk of wearing glasses "for reading", rather than "to read".
     

    fangoso

    Senior Member
    spanish-Venezuela
    Either of those can be used, in my view, although they seem to throw up surprisingly few hits if you google them.

    It's perhaps more usual to talk of wearing glasses "for reading", rather than "to read".
    How about "using glasses for reading"?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    How about "using glasses for reading"?
    :thumbsdown:

    A: I can't see to read this small print.
    B: Well, use your reading glasses then.:thumbsdown: Why don't you put your glasses on?
    B: Well, use a magnifying glass then.:tick:


    I'm happier with the magnifying glass example, because we have to hold the magnifying glass, as when we "use" a tool.


    Edit:
    (Explaining to someone who doesn't know what glasses are for)

    A: What's the use of these old things?
    B: Those are my glasses.
    A: Oh, and what are glasses for?

    B: I use them sometimes for reading.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I use glasses to read. I'm wearing them right now.

    That's exactly what I say, which is why I just wrote it.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I didn't say it isn't acceptable, and Andy says he "uses glasses to read".

    I wouldn't normally talk about "using" spectacles, because it's more natural to me to talk about "wearing" them. I don't "use" an umbrella to protect me from the rain either: I "hold" an umbrella, or "put up" an umbrella. And I don't talk about "using" my watch to tell the time:

    I wear a watch so that I know what time it is
    I wear glasses so that I can see clearly.

    Edit: I reserve "use" mostly for less passive things, as when I use a knife and fork to eat with. I "use" a magnifying glass to read with, because I have to hold it and move it over the print: it's more of a tool.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I don't get it. If it is acceptable to say that, then why wouldn't it be acceptable to say "I'm using glasses for reading"?
    To use two present participles so close together, and in such an unnatural way, simply sounds odd. It isn't ungrammatical, but it is something no native speaker would ever say. If you use it, you won't be "wrong", but you will certainly not be speaking natural English.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't get it. If it is acceptable to say that, then why wouldn't it be acceptable to say "I'm using glasses for reading"?
    To be fair, as ever it depends on the context. If you were "getting on a bit" and therefore becoming long-sighted, you might say to someone "I'm using glasses for reading these days, but in terms of distance I can still see quite well."
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    My dad used to say, "I only need glasses [in order] to drive." (He could read fine, but his distance vision was poor.)

    I used to need glasses for both reading and driving; now I see fine (surgery solved this issue).:)

    In this context, "for" works fine.
     

    fangoso

    Senior Member
    spanish-Venezuela
    The cases I'm talking about are those in which you specfy the purpose for which you wear the glasses. How about "I use glasses to see close-up"?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'll go back to what I said:
    I need glasses to see close up.

    "Close up" should not be hyphenated.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm in the 'wear' camp, if the contrast is with 'use', in the same way as I 'wear' clothes rather than 'use' them. Considerable overlap is possible. I do 'use' my husband's old shirts as painting smocks, but I have no alternative use for my specs.

    Unlike clothes, I don't wear my glasses all the time, just for watching interesting TV and reading very small print. That's mainly what I use them for, unlike my husband who wears them almost all his waking hours.

    Using 'use' could have a slightly comic effect -

    Simple Question: What do you use your glasses for?
    Rude Answer: What do you think I use them for, duh? Lighting fires?


    The problem is that the question should be "When do you use them?" or "When do you need to use them?"
    But that could sound as if 'using' glasses was a cosmetic or sartorial question, as if the glasses are accessories. "I use glasses when I want to appear intelligent" or "I use glasses when I need a disguise".

    Then we have the word 'need' which, I suggest is more common than 'use'.

    I was fifty before I needed glasses.
    I need glasses to read very small print, or to see at a distance.
    My husband needed glasses from an early age.
     

    fangoso

    Senior Member
    spanish-Venezuela
    "Close up" should not be hyphenated.
    Thanks for the correction

    I'll go back to what I said:
    I need glasses to see close up.
    So you would never say "use" in this case, would you?

    Using 'use' could have a slightly comic effect -

    Simple Question: What do you use your glasses for?
    Rude Answer: What do you think I use them for, duh? Lighting fires?
    Glasses are usually either to see close up or far away so I consider that question valid
     
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    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thanks for the correction


    So you would never say "use in this case, would you?



    Glasses are usually either to see close up or far away so I consider that question valid
    Thanks for the correction


    So you would never say "use in this case, would you?



    Glasses are usually either to see close up or far away so I consider that question valid
    Despite the fact that glasses are used for close up or far away, I almost never hear them described as such. I usually hear, "I use them for reading" or "I use them for driving" or "I use them to get a good sight picture" (at the pistol range).
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Glasses usually are either to see close up or far a way away so I consider that question valid
    Not in my experience, they aren't. Glasses that do both and in-between are very common in the UK. They are called 'varifocal' or 'multifocal'. These lenses provide graduated vision correction compared with the old-fashioned 'bi-focals', which combined 'far-sighted' and 'near-sighted' vision correction in distinct and obvious areas of the lenses.

    People looking at my varifocal glasses can't tell what sort of correction they provide.
    I have only one pair of glasses, which serve as sunglasses too, so they serve all my vision needs. People do sometimes comment on how they darken when light is bright.
     
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    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    They are called 'varifocal' or 'multifocal'. These lenses provide graduated vision correction compared to the old-fashioned 'bi-focal', which combined 'far-sighted' or 'near-sighted' vision correction in distinct and obvious areas of the lenses.
    We call them "progressives" over here; at least that's what the eye doctor calls mine.
     

    fangoso

    Senior Member
    spanish-Venezuela
    Ok, excuse my ignorance about glasses :oops: but in conclusion, is to correct say "I use glasses to do/for doing something"?.
     
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