I went the distance she went [appositive case or relative-pronoun case]

Curiosity777

Senior Member
Korean
* I went the distance she went.
(I made this sentence)

Is this sentence kind of an appositive case? Can we think of "that" as omitted in the sentence as in "I went the distance (that) she went? Here, "that" is leading a clause as well as referring to "the distance". Like this, if "she went" is used appositively, can we grammatically omit "that"? This case seems to have something to do with this case in which "the way (that)" is used because we normally don't include "that" when we use "the way (that)" as in "I like the way (that) you're.

But there seem to be also some people who argue that this "that" is just a relative pronoun. But as for the verb "go", I wouldn't agree with them in that generally most native speakers tend not to regard "went" as used transitively in my sentence and if "the distance" is really the object of "went", this sentence (I went the distance, which she went) must sound correct to all native speakers, but as far as I ask them about it, just only few of them would think of the sentence as grammatically correct.

To sum up,

1. Is my sentence an appositive case?

2. If 1 is right, is it grammatically acceptable to omit "that" in the sentence?

3. If 2 is right, can you answer on when to able to grammatically omit "that" or not?

4. Does that sentence have something to do with "the way (that)" usage?
 
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  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I went the (same) distance (that) she went.
    "That" introduces a relative clause. It could be omitted


    I don't see how "she went" can be appositive.

    I went the same distance, 500 yards. (appositive)
    I went the same distance; I went 500 yards.
    I went the same distance she went.
    I went she went

    Edited typo
     
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    Curiosity777

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I went the (same) distance (that) she went.
    "That" introduces a relative clause. It could be omitted


    I don't see how "she went" can be apositive.

    I went the same distance, 500 yards. (appositive)
    I went the same distance; I went 500 yards.
    I went the same distance she went.
    I went she went

    To me, "(that) she went" is just an adjective clause modifying "the same distance"
    If "that" is really introducing a relative clause, "which" must be able to substitute "that" for that position, but this sentence "I went the same distance which she went" sounds very unnatural and grammatically incorrect . Even if "which" is used non-restrictively as in "I went the same distance, which was 500miles she went", like this, "which" cannot be the direct object of "went".
    Of course, some dictionaries such as Merriam Webster define this usage of "go" as a transitive verb, but as this confusion occurs by this definition, I'd stick to the definition by Oxford Dictionary that "go" is an intransitive verb in this usage.
     
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