I will dispatch of it efficiently.

lapot

Senior Member
Hello. I've been watching the series 'Prison Break' and I've come across this sentence. There's a group of people talking about the mission they're doing. One of them is the one who must go someplace to kill another guy. He says:

'I'd be more than willing to take on that assignment, and I assure you I will dispatch of it efficiently.'

The part of 'dispatch of' sounds a little weird to my ears. Do you think it's common? I would think that the expression 'dispatch someone/something', without 'of' it's more common. In fact, 'dispatch of' doesn't appear in any dictionary I've seen, at least with this meaning.

What do you think?
Thanks in advance!!
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    From the OED definition of "dispatch":
    4.
    Thesaurus »
    a. To get rid of or dispose of (any one) by putting to death; to make away with, kill. 5.
    Thesaurus »
    a. To dispose or rid oneself promptly of (a piece of business, etc.); to get done, get through, accomplish, settle, finish off, conclude, execute promptly or speedily.


    "Dispatch" can be simply transitive, but I've often seen it with "of," probably because of its similarity in meaning to "dispose of." This character definitely seems to be trying to sound fancy or high-toned in his speech, which is why he would choose the slightly recherché, affected, and euphemistic "dispatch of."
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It sounds pretty weird to me, too, lapot:(.

    Perhaps what the scriptwriters here are trying to indicate is that this character is using words - like dispatch - which are unfamiliar to him?

    ....

    Cross-posted with lucas.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Perhaps what the scriptwriters here are trying to indicate is that this character is using words - like dispatch - which are unfamiliar to him?
    Or of course it could mean that the scriptwriters, in trying to make the character sound smart, are using words that are unfamiliar to them​!
     

    oieblanche

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I'd assume that the speaker was trying to respond in a way that made it less obvious that he was planning a murder. He's speaking "code"--they both know he means, I'll kill the guy for you with no problems, but he's speaking in an abstract way. It's purposefully vague to imply something covert. In similar plots, characters say: "Have you acquired the goods?" The goods is awkward--the whole thing is overly formal. But they are asking, do you have the illegal guns/drugs/money?
    It's a tv/movie convention for covert dialogue.
     
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