I will go/I will be going/I go/I am going/I am going to go to the cinema tomorrow

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russian80

Senior Member
Russian
A. How idiomatic are the following dialogues?
B. What are the connotations?
C. What is the implied communicative meaning (e.g. how easy would it be to persuade the respondent to go for a swim tomorrow)?
D. How would the answers be taken by the asker emotionally?

1.
- Would you like to join me for a swim tomorrow?
- Actually, tomorrow I will go to the cinema.

2.
- Would you like to join me for a swim tomorrow?
- Actually, tomorrow I will be going to the cinema.

3.
- Would you like to join me for a swim tomorrow?
- Actually, tomorrow I am going to the cinema.

4.
- Would you like to join me for a swim tomorrow?
- Actually, tomorrow I go to the cinema.

5.
- Would you like to join me for a swim tomorrow?
- Actually, tomorrow I am going to go to the cinema.

6.
- Would you like to join me for a swim tomorrow?
- Actually, tomorrow I was going to go to the cinema.
 
Last edited:
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Without some sort of numbering system on your suggestions it’s hard to answer about these variations.
    Can you add some?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Cool.
    Lets look at the “idiomatic” issue first.

    1. No. Native speakers would not say that.

    2. Possible, but unlikely, I’d expect something else: I will be going to the cinema and then meeting my folks.

    3 An ordinary and expected version. Re Point C: the respondent seems pretty certain, I don’t see much scope for persuading her to change her plan.

    4. As 1. Doesn’t seem a natural expression in the context.

    5. Again, not very natural. No need for the extra words in there.

    6. Ah. Now some scope for thinking she is wavering in her plan and might be persuaded to go swimming. “Was going to ...” definitely introduces a note of flexibility to her cinema plan.


    I don’t think we can say much about B or D for any of these without knowing a lot more about the speakers and their relationship.

    As it stands 3 and 6 are the most natural, and 3 is more certain than 6.

    Phew.
     

    russian80

    Senior Member
    Russian
    4. As 1. Doesn’t seem a natural expression in the context.
    What about

    4.
    - Would you like to join me for a swim tomorrow?
    - Let me see my schedule. Sorry, tomorrow I go on a business trip to London.

    I don’t think we can say much about B or D for any of these without knowing a lot more about the speakers and their relationship.
    Let us say, the asker is you and the respondent is your friend.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    What about

    4.
    - Would you like to join me for a swim tomorrow?
    - Let me see my schedule. Sorry, tomorrow I go on a business trip to London.



    Let us say, the asker is you and the respondent is your friend.
    No. “I go” isn’t an option.

    Between me and my friend there is no obvious emotional message other than the point I already made.
    Maybe my friend would soften the blow with more words like:
    Sorry mate ..
    That sounds great but ..
    Thanks for asking but ...

    Or maybe she’d ask me if I wanted to join her at the cinema, or suggest a different date for swimming?

    Making normal social plans with pals usually takes a few steps so I don’t get “emotional” at this stage.

    I currently have a pal whose husband I am not very keen on, so I feel like I am forever making excuses to avoid her suggestions. I guess she is realising this by now. That’s tricky, on both sides of the dialogue!
     
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