I will keep abreast of it.

Kolridg

Senior Member
Russian
My question is if phrase "I will keep abreast of it" is idiomatic. I don't know why exactly, but it seems to me that idiomatic would be the same phrase but in present simple: "I keep abreast of it" and even if I would suppose that I will watch over some things in future or continue to watch over them like I did before and probably do now, but anyway without thinking about current moment.
 
  • Dryan

    Senior Member
    English - Northeastern U.S.
    I don't like the present simple here because it's an ongoing event. If you are going to keep abreast of it you must continue to do so into the future (otherwise you aren't abreast of it; it got ahead of you).
    The implication of keeping abreast of something is that the thing you're abreast of is a moving target and subject to change. In order for you to keep up with it, you must monitor it continuously not just habitually / in the present.
     
    Last edited:

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The present simple indicates a habitual action, so “I keep abreast of it” conveys that that’s something you do all the time / on a regular basis.

    You can also say it in the present continuous, “I’m keeping abreast of it” (which adds the nuance of reassuring someone that you’re doing it).

    If you don’t currently do it but intend to in the future, then, of course, you can say “I will keep abreast of it”.
     

    lentulax

    Senior Member
    UK English
    [
    My question is if phrase "I will keep abreast of it" is idiomatic. I don't know why exactly, but it seems to me that idiomatic would be the same phrase but in present simple: "I keep abreast of it" and even if I would suppose that I will watch over some things in future or continue to watch over them like I did before and probably do now, but anyway without thinking about current moment.
    But what exactly do you want to say? 'I will keep abreast of it' is grammatically available, though there may not be many situations where you might want to avail yourself of it ; your question (offering a possibly more idiomatic suggestion,'I keep abreast of it') suggests you do have a specific meaning in mind; the rest of your sentence, perhaps, goes on to explain what it is you have in mind, but I think you haven't quite managed to make that clear in English ; re-reading it, I wonder of what you are thinking of might be something like 'I shall continue to keep abreast of it'.
    ['I will keep you abreast of...' is of course much more common.]
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    And aside from those issues, it seems to me that that word is most often used in descriptions of other people. I have never heard anyone use it about themselves as a voluntary action. "Keep up with" seems much more natural to me.

    Examples

    Advertisement:
    Stay abreast of the news and the world around you. Subscribe to the Daily Banner!

    Person:
    I keep up with the news by reading the Daily Banner.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    You must be very sure of yourself if you can state with authority "I will keep abreast of it", unless you are using "will" in the emphatic sense of determination, rather than as a marker of future time. I might say:

    I will try to keep/stay abreast of it. I'm determined to keep/stay abreast of it.
     

    Kolridg

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thank you for your replies. They shed the light onto the phrase I'm not certain about.

    I assumed that Present Simple phrase was idiomatic because my context dictionary gave no exact match to Future Simple pattern I will keep abreast of, what you can see yourself by the link: I will keep abreast of | English examples in context | Ludwig.

    At that, of corse there are similar matches like we'll keep abreast of, I will keep you abreast you in the list, but I considered if phrase is idiomatic then it is often used in texts and as a consequence it must be spitted as it is at least in a few entries of the context dictionary. But there, as you can see, is no even one entry that would match the query exactly.

    Taking into account this and that Present Simple has matches in context dicitonary (as well as Past Simple) I keep abreast of | English examples in context | Ludwig I made assumption that Present Simple was what I needed to say even if talked about my future intentions.

    Actually, what I wanted to say by telling "I will keep abreast of it" is that... Well, I always tell this phrase to my business partner in UK when I finish the conversation and want to say that I will watch over the things on my side very well and be attentive to any developments or changes. After reading the answers I now somehow doubt that it is correct phrase for that purpose, isn't it? What would you use instead to avoid so ordinary words like "will watch over the things"? Thank you.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    After reading the answers I now somehow doubt that it is correct phrase for that purpose, isn't it?
    In my opinion it's not. I've never heard anyone say that in that situation.

    "I will keep an eye on things.", "I will keep an eye on the situation.", "I will stay on top of things (on this end)." are normal things to hear (in AE, at least).
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think that more often than not it’s used in the phrase “keep abreast of developments”, which implies closely following the progress of a specific situation / keeping up with the latest news.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top