I will keep you (all) informed.

Autumnfall555

New Member
English- United States
Hello. I am trying to translate the following sentence from English to Spanish:

I will keep you (all) informed.

This is a sentence that appears at the end of a letter sent out to families and teachers in a school district.

My question is, would this sentence be written with "les" or "los"? I'm not sure if leismo comes into play here or if there are regional differences for the usage of los/les.

My attempt: Les mantendré informados OR Los mantendré informados
 
  • Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    Les mantendré informados: Google translator

    Sandoval mentions le occurrences with ver, esperar, felicitar y mantener (together with saludar) as traces of "overly-careful, formal speech. He maintains that the Castilian Spanish norm colors such usage. In Casos de leísmo en México, he points to the influence of commercial speech used in advertising (“le esperamos”) and that of radio announcers as fostering leísta usage."

    He contends that le appears frequently as the DO with the verbs of ayudar, corresponder and entender. He argues that the co-occurrence of le with these verbs -- and not others -- is totally by chance and that such happenstance indicates a still broader trend toward leísmo as seen from his sample here. “Me pidió que le ayudara”; “de manera que trátalo y, si te simpatiza, puedes corresponderle”; “ay, pues yo no les entendí.” (p. 307)*

    *Cantero Sandoval, G. (1979). Casos de leísmo en México. Anuario de Letras, 1(17). 305-308.

    (Mexican clitic use: leísmo vs. creativity by Kitz Cleary of The University of Minnesota)

    If you want to read opinions about leísmo, you can click on the following link:

    Mixed leísmo and non leísmo at the same time | Antimoon Forum
     
    Last edited:

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I will keep you (all) informed.

    My attempt: Les mantendré informados OR Los mantendré informados
    The DRAE calls mantener a transitive verb in all of its meanings, so it should take a direct object pronoun (los) when that pronoun is plural. I think (not sure) that in some places it is acceptable to use "le" for a singular, male object.

    Wait to see what the natives say.
     
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