I will not vanish, because I am not afraid of change.

sonostudente

New Member
USA
English - American
Ciao,
I'm writing a short composition for an italian class, and I'm trying to find the best way to say the following.
"I will not vanish, because I am not afraid of change." The context - the idea is that we don't grow if we don't challenge ourselves; we stagnate if we avoid change.
What I've come up with is
"Io non svaniro, perche non ho paura dei cambiamenti." I guess my two biggest questions are about using svanire in a figurative sense like I did (va bene?) and about "...paura dei cambiamenti" being the proper translation of "afraid of change" (where change is a noun). Any suggestions are welcome, I would like to stay as true to the english as possible.
Grazie!
 
  • danalto

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Ciao,
    I'm writing a short composition for an italian class, and I'm trying to find the best way to say the following.
    "I will not vanish, because I am not afraid of change." The context - the idea is that we don't grow if we don't challenge ourselves; we stagnate if we avoid change.
    What I've come up with is
    "Io non svanirò, perché non ho paura dei cambiamenti." I guess my two biggest questions are about using svanire in a figurative sense like I did (va bene?) and about "...paura dei cambiamenti" being the proper translation of "afraid of change" (where change is a noun). Any suggestions are welcome, I would like to stay as true to the english as possible.
    Grazie!
    Is a very strange sentence both in English and in Italian, though! Why "vanish / svanire"?
     

    sonostudente

    New Member
    USA
    English - American
    Yes, it is a little strange :) , but it works in English. Vanishing was supposed to mean something similar to losing a bit of yourself (not meeting your full potential) by not taking full advantage of all the opportunites life has to offer... makes more sense with a thorough explanation, but I suppose it's just a little less poetic.
     

    danalto

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Yes, it is a little strange :) , but it works in English. Vanishing was supposed to mean something similar to losing a bit of yourself (not meeting your full potential) by not taking full advantage of all the opportunites life has to offer... makes more sense with a thorough explanation, but I suppose it's just a little less poetic.
    Non mi perderò could be an equivalent...

    P.S.: welcome in WR!
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Yes, it is a little strange :) , but it works in English.
    I wouldn't have understood it without reading the explanation you provided, then I do admit it is quite poetic and does work, but the first time I read it I was almost scratching my head. For your Italian class I think sticking closer to more real language is always good, until you really get a hang of what would sound good in both languages.

    Just a tip :p Feel free to ignore me.

    Maybe to be a bit poetic still, but talk about stagnating and not doing new things you can use "Non mi arrugginisco..." (I won't rust... i.e. not do anything and go into a process of decay).
    Does it work Dani?
     

    danalto

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    I wouldn't have understood it without reading the explanation you provided, then I do admit it is quite poetic and does work, but the first time I read it I was almost scratching my head. For your Italian class I think sticking closer to more real language is always good, until you really get a hang of what would sound good in both languages.

    Just a tip :p Feel free to ignore me.

    Maybe to be a bit poetic still, but talk about stagnating and not doing new things you can use "Non mi arrugginisco..." (I won't rust...).
    Does it work Dani?
    Hmm...dunno... :D
     

    sonostudente

    New Member
    USA
    English - American
    danalto: "non mi perdero" (I can't seem to make the accents work on my computer, but thanks for pointing that out) but anyway, "non mi perdero" sounds good to me. as a figurative expression, does it work in Italian?

    Alxmrphi: I appreciate the suggestion! I hate to be picky, it's just that "to rust" seems a little too abrasive. Any other ideas?

    Also can either one of you tell me how correct the second part of the translation is?
    Thank you both!
     

    danalto

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    danalto: "non mi perdero" (I can't seem to make the accents work on my computer, but thanks for pointing that out) but anyway, "non mi perdero" sounds good to me. as a figurative expression, does it work in Italian? YES!

    Alxmrphi: I appreciate the suggestion! I hate to be picky, it's just that "to rust" seems a little too abrasive. Any other ideas?

    Also can either one of you tell me how correct the second part of the translation is?
    Thank you both!
    You can find the accents you need here, where you are writing in this very moment: you see? Up there on the right? :D

    @Alex: it's 3.41 am on my planet...
     
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