I will pick you up by car.

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  • marques

    New Member
    Brasil - português
    Actually, Boston Dude, "Vou te pegar no meu carro" can be used too; "Vou te pegar de carro" is only simpler :cool:
     

    southernblot

    New Member
    Portuguese
    I'm sorry, but I just saw this post and since I'm a native speaker I feel that I have to comment on something...

    Portuguese and Brazilian are the same language, but most expressions are different. If you write that "vou-te pegar de carro" is Portuguese, please precise that it's Brazilian Portuguese. In Portuguese from Portugal, it sounds awful, it sounds as you don't know how to speak!
    So, in Portuguese, the correct translation is simply: "vou-te buscar (de carro)"
     

    Denis555

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Please, don't make the same mistake you're trying to correct! If that's the case...

    I'm sorry, but I just saw this post and since I'm a native speaker I feel that I have to comment on something...

    Portuguese and Brazilian are the same language, but most expressions are different. If you write that "vou-te pegar de carro" is Portuguese, please precise that it's Brazilian Portuguese. In Portuguese from Portugal, it sounds awful, it sounds as you don't know how to speak!
    So, in European Portuguese, the correct translation is simply: "vou-te buscar (de carro)"
     

    Alentugano

    Senior Member
    Português - Portugal
    I'm sorry, but I just saw this post and since I'm a native speaker I feel that I have to comment on something...

    Portuguese and Brazilian are the same language, but most expressions are different. If you write that "vou-te pegar de carro" is Portuguese, please precise that it's Brazilian Portuguese. In Portuguese from Portugal, it sounds awful, it sounds as you don't know how to speak!
    So, in Portuguese, the correct translation is simply: "vou-te buscar (de carro)"
    Well, this is a matter of opinion, as "vou te pegar de carro" doesn't sound anything near awful to me, it just sounds like someone from Brazil would say I will pick you up by car. Furthermore I think it is a bit extreme to use the word awful in this context. Anyway, vou te pegar de carro would be perfectly understood here in Portugal.
     

    southernblot

    New Member
    Portuguese
    Well, this is a matter of opinion, as "vou te pegar de carro" doesn't sound anything near awful to me, it just sounds like someone from Brazil would say I will pick you up by car. Furthermore I think it is a bit extreme to use the word awful in this context. Anyway, vou te pegar de carro would be perfectly understood here in Portugal.
    ok, i will refrain from making comments like "awful". but even if it would be understood, it is no less incorrect.
     

    Alentugano

    Senior Member
    Português - Portugal
    Hi southernblot,

    Would you care to explain why do you consider "vou-te pegar de carro" to be incorrect?
     

    greenie

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I am not sure of this, as I am not a native speaker of Portuguese, but my understanding is that the hyphen is only used to seperate a verb in infinitive form from the object pronoun.

    Example:

    Vai te falar logo.
    Vai falar-te logo.

    Please correct me if this is mistaken.
     

    southernblot

    New Member
    Portuguese
    Hi southernblot,

    Would you care to explain why do you consider "vou-te pegar de carro" to be incorrect?
    my only point in the discussion is that "vou-te pegar de carro" is brazilian portuguese and incorrect in "european" portuguese and, therefore, if you want to translate the sentence like this, you should mention that you are talking about "brazilian" portuguese. it is like for ex, comparing british english with american english. although it is the same language, they are two different variants and many expressions and grammatical rules differ.

    why is it incorrect? just starting with "vou-te pegar" instead of "vou pegar-te" is incorrect. but it is a very common mistake to make (i also make it sometimes) and it is influenced by the enourmous amount of brazilian soap operas that we watch in portugal.
    using the expression "pegar" is also incorrect in "european" portuguese. maybe you can "pegar" an object, but you will never "pegar" a person...it literaly means taking that person in your arms. rather, i would say "buscar" in this context.
     
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