I will try harder / I'll try my best

kyn

Senior Member
Vietnamese
Thanks. Actually I was trying to translate "I'll try harder./I'll try my best (from now on)". Is it OK to say like I did?

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  • samanthalee

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, English - [Singapore]
    I have been told that when a Japanese says "I'll try my best", it means "It cannot be done, but it's not polite to tell that in your face".

    Therefore saying "I'll be more careful from now on", as suggested by akimura, is a better choice.
     

    kyn

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    No, you got me wrong. The sentence "I'll try my best" is used in a different situation.
    E.g. - Before a game (football match...)
    - When you want to show your ditermination to study/learn something.
    ...
     

    kaito

    Senior Member
    German
    I think you might want to remove the "try" part since if there's a negative nuance like Sam said, it's probably mainly because of the try part.

    I searched the dictionary for a few words since I was curious.

    腕に縒りを掛ける; 腕によりを掛ける; 腕に縒りをかける; 腕によりをかける 【うでによりをかける】 (exp) to put all one's skill (into doing something); to do something to the best of one's ability
    最善を尽くす 【さいぜんをつくす】 (exp) to do one's best; to do something to the best of one's ability
    極力努める; 極力勉める; 極力つとめる 【きょくりょくつとめる】 (v1) to do one's best

    Theres much more, I picked those that looked simple.
    That would also mean that my guess about the "try" part was right, because somehow I doubt the Japanese have so many different expessions for "It cannot be done, but it's not polite to tell that in your face".
    Though I've been proven wrong countless times before ^^

    If you want to see the whole list open up Jim Breen's WWWJDIC and search for "best".

    You also might want to say 出来るだけ学ぶ
    頑張る is probably the best all purpose choice since I hear that the most.

    Off Topic: I stumbled on something funny while browsing the dictionary: 女房と畳は新しい方が良い
     

    kyn

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Ok, to put it simply, how would you say "I'll try my best"/"I'll try harder" in these cases:
    1. ~ The next football match is very important to us. ~Yeah I know. I'll try my best.
    2. ~ You've done a good job, but I believe you can do it better. ~ Thanks. I'll try harder.
    3. ~ You're the new employee , right. This is a very tough job, you know? ~ Yes, I know. I'll try my best.
     

    akimura

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi, kyn. I'm sorry I didn't get your second example sentences wrong in your first message.

    Ok, to put it simply, how would you say "I'll try my best"/"I'll try harder" in these cases:
    1. ~ The next football match is very important to us. ~Yeah I know. I'll try my best.
    2. ~ You've done a good job, but I believe you can do it better. ~ Thanks. I'll try harder.
    3. ~ You're the new employee , right. This is a very tough job, you know? ~ Yes, I know. I'll try my best.
    In these situations, we are still thinking about something to say to your boss, right? Well, then...

    1. I'll try my best.

    - 最善を尽くします。
    - 最善を尽くすつもりです。

    These two would work. The following is something I would be most likely to say:
    - 最高のパフォーマンスを発揮できるよう頑張ります。

    2. I'll try harder.
    At first sight, I thought your boss was discouraged by your midicore performance and was telling you to meet his or her requirements next time. But you respond, "Thanks." So, I now assume that your boss is fully satisfied with your performance and is encouraging you to exceed his or her expectations with the next assignment. Then, the following would work:

    - なおいっそう頑張ります。
    - これに満足することなく、なお一層頑張ります。

    3. I'll try my best.

    It's a little tough one for me, so let me start from "Yes, I know." part.

    "Yes, I know. I'll try my best."
    - 承知しているつもりです。皆様の足を引っ張らないよう頑張ります。

    To 足を引っ張る as a Japanese idiom is different from to pull someone's leg or making fun of someone as in an English idiom; it means you are the main cause of making others less productive. In this example, your boss doesn't sound like a nice guy to me, because he emphasizes that you are new and that the job to do will be a tough one, as if to say you are not a competent enough worker. So, I would recommend that you be really modest or take a humble attitude.

    Even if your boss is not so bossy, new employees tend to be modest in Japan, so "I'll try not to make the team's performance less productive." would be a wise, and generrally chosen, phrase by Japanese new employees.
     
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