I will try to call you in p.m. when I get free.

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Kolridg

Senior Member
Russian
Please tell, whether you take the next sentence as if somebody would bend effort to find time and strength to call when he gets free (he is doing something again after he gets free from work: maybe he is busy with hosehold chores or studying something), or as if somebody would try to get through to the person he needs to talk to (that person is hard to get through to in p.m.)

I will try to call you in p.m. when I get free.

Please note, that both contexts in the brackets above are actual: my friend knows that I'm often busy after work in p.m. time, and at that he knows that I know that it is hard to reach out to him in p.m. time. So what will he think when he reads that line sent to his messanger by me?

I'm asking this question because as far as I'm concerned verb "try" has two meanings - to bend effort in order to do something, and to make attempt to do something. So, it must be, if he means first meaning (to bend effort) then the sentence will suggest him that I am going to be busy in p.m. as I often am and I will strive to find time to call him. If second one (to make an attempt) then the sentence must suggest that I will be making attempts to get through to him in p.m.

Your opinion or idea please?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'm not clear what you mean by "to bend effort." The sentence means "I will make an attempt to call you in the afternoon..."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    We don't say p.m. time. That's just called "the afternoon".

    I will try to call you in the afternoon after I get off work.

    That indicates you will make an effort to call him. If he knows you are a busy person he should understand that it's not a promise. It will depend on what is going on with you at the time whether you will able to.
     

    Kolridg

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I'm not clear what you mean by "to bend effort."
    In the dictionary it is said that "try" can mean:
    v.i.
    1. to make an attempt or effort; strive:
      Try to complete the examination.
    try - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

    And in my understanding, as my context dictionary suggests, "to make an effort" is the same as "to bend an effort". (However, I assume "to bend an effort" implies more effort being made than "to make an effort" does. Anyway it's not the point of the topic.)

    So, I imagine that the next cases would give different meaning of "try".

    1.
    - Bill, forward behave yourself!
    - Sure, Mike. I promise I will try to be a good boy since now.


    I imagine Mike is promising to make (bend) an effort to be better rather than he is promising to just make an attempt to be better. Isn't it so? I see no sense in promising about making attempts since the imaginary context suggests Mike has done something rather bad and he needs now to promise to bend effort to be better, not just promise to attempt to be better.

    2.
    - This computer got frozen when I switched it on in the morning.
    - Just try to switch it on one more time, it happens that he is frozen sometimes, nothing serious.


    He will just make an attempt to switch it on once again. Obviously, he doesn't need to bend an effort to accomplish it, since to press a button is something mechanical and easy to do, not requiring making special effort.

    The sentence means "I will make an attempt to call you in the afternoon..."
    So you take that as "I will make an attempt to get through to you"? Why so, please?

    It's curious that Kentix, the another native speaker, understands that quite the way round:

    We don't say p.m. time. That's just called "the afternoon".

    I will try to call you in the afternoon after I get off work.

    That indicates you will make an effort to call him. If he knows you are a busy person he should understand that it's not a promise. It will depend on what is going on with you at the time whether you will able to.
     
    Last edited:

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Effort cannot be bent. It is an error.
    We do say "in the afternoon". But notice that we do not say "in afternoon". Very rarely, and in limited contexts, we might abbreviate "afternoon" to "p.m." and say "in the p.m." (though this is not good practice), but again, never without the article "the".

    - Bill, forward behave yourself! :cross: "Forward" makes no sense here. Did you mean "Behave yourself in (the) future!"?
    I will try to be a good boy since now :cross: "Since" is for past events, not present ones. You need "from now on".
     

    Kolridg

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hi Edinburgher,

    Why do you consider that effort can't be bent? It is idiomatic expression after all.

    bend (one's) efforts
    To put forth a great deal of effort toward some goal or end.I've been bending my efforts to find a way out of these legal problems, but, as of now, I'm still going to prison.
    bend efforts

    - Bill, forward behave yourself! :cross: "Forward" makes no sense here. Did you mean "Behave yourself in (the) future!"?
    Yes, thank you for correction.
     
    Last edited:

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Why do you consider that effort can't be bent? It is idiomatic expression after all.
    No. The idiomatic expression is "bend (one's) efforts". The possessive pronoun is not optional, it is required, but changes to fit the subject.
    Mary bent her efforts to improving her piano playing.
    I've been bending my efforts to getting George to say "please".

    You can't bend somebody else's efforts.
    Mary bent Fred's efforts to doing the washing up. :cross:o_O
     

    Kolridg

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Now I understand the difference between "bend one's efforts" and "make effort". Thank you. My context dictionary led me on suggesting the same translation for both.

    Meanwhile, I still don't understand how to construe "try" with regard to the initial question of the topic. Here I rephrase the question and give very clear explanation what is the issue I will try to call you in p.m. when I get free.

    You can use option "make effort", which I give along with "bend effort" there.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I will try to call you in this context means I will attempt to call you. He knows you are busy in the afternoon, so he also knows he may fail to contact you. If he was sure of getting you he could have said I will call you. There's no implication that any effort will be involved - he will try when he is free, not if he can find the time to make the call.

    The sentence I will try to call you could imply effort in another context. For example I'm going to be really busy all afternoon, but I'll try to call you.
     

    Kolridg

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I will try to call you in this context means I will attempt to call you. He knows you are busy in the afternoon, so he also knows he may fail to contact you. If he was sure of getting you he could have said I will call you. There's no implication that any effort will be involved - he will try when he is free, not if he can find the time to make the call.

    The sentence I will try to call you could imply effort in another context. For example I'm going to be really busy all afternoon, but I'll try to call you.
    Thanks, I have now confirmation that "try" can work both ways in such a sentence. However, if both conditions are present - he knows I'm busy in the afternoon, and he knows that I quite know he is busy in the afternoon (we are both busy), could we determine what way "try" works there? Or it is that type of situation where we can't determine the meaning of the word without knowing what interlocutor meant exactly?

    I guess then he should have used other words instead of "try" to be exact about his intention? I mean he should have clearly said "I will attempt to call you in the afternoon" in case underlying sense had been he might not get me as I was busy, and "I will make an effort to call you in the afternoon" in case underlying sense had been he would deliberately find time among other doings to call me?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Try" and "attempt" have the same meaning in this context. "Attempt" is not "clearer." Both suggest "I will dial the phone even though you may not answer."
    "I will make an effort to call you." means that I will do work to find some time in my own schedule and when I find that time, I will try to call you.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    "I will try to..." is an equivalent of "I will attempt to..." but is much more commonly said and heard ('attempt' is more formal). "I will make an effort to..." puts more emphasis on the fact that this may be more difficult for you to do.
     
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