I win.

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Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
It is common where I live to say "I win!" if I win a game or beat someone at a game. If you win the game, "You win!", if you lose the game, "You lose." These are interesting in that they are present tense for something that has just happened.
[...]
This is something that's always puzzled me in English.
You win -- present tense used to express something that's just happened, it contradicts the rules instilled into English sutdents' minds.

Is it the only tense option for winning/losing a game in the context described by Forero?

How about the perfect: You've won/You've lost? Is it used?

Thanks,
Tom
 
  • ace02nc

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Yes, you can use either one. "Congratulations, you've won." "Sorry, it looks like you've lost." Both are perfectly acceptable alternatives.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    So what's the difference then?
    I remember ever seeing you win/you lose while playing a computer game.

    Tom
     

    kitenok

    Senior Member
    Hi Thomas,
    I can't really think of a way to systematize the use of verb tenses in these expressions, but here are a few impressions:

    You win! = colloquial expression, said mainly when conceding in a game or an argument (and used by computer games, apparently :))

    I win! or You lose! = colloquial expressions, said mainly when gloating about one's recent victory

    Congratulations, you've won! = a formal or courteous way of informing someone of a victory (probably in a situation where the person did not already know s/he had won)

    Sorry, it looks like you've lost. A formal or courteous (maybe sarcastically so) way of saying "You lose."

    I won! = what I would probably say in surprise upon discovering I had won a prize or a lottery
     

    bloomhaven

    Member
    English - Canada
    In my experience (I'm Canadian), you've won and you've lost are quite formal and would seldom be used among friends. These expressions would more likely be used when informing someone of a win or loss that they're not already aware of, for example, if you were to enter a poetry contest and your entry won, you would be informed "Congratulations, you've won". But in a game between friends, I've never heard this more formal version used.

    Hope this helps.
     
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