I would advise he teach his Ivy League pals--Wrong?

Beth_Lee

Member
Chinese
Hello.

When I was reading the magazine, Reason, I came up with this:
"I would advise he teach his Ivy League pals."
- The original context:
'Here is what I would advise he teach his Ivy League pals, and anyone else who may find himself unexpectedly confronted by a police officer.'


I'm confused by it. I think we say 'Here's what I would advise him to teach his lvy League.'
Because we need an object pronoun there, it's an object. And after that, we add a 'to'.

Am I wrong?
Please help!
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I think it's the subjunctive.

    Here is what I would advise he teach his Ivy League pals ...

    It's fine for me, as is.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, they're both correct, yours and the original. 'Advise' can be followed by a finite clause with a subject, and this can be indicative or subjunctive; or it can be followed by an object and an infinitive clause:

    I would advise (that) he teaches/teach his pals. [finite clause]
    I would advise him to teach his pals. [infinitive clause]

    With the finite clause, it is not clear who I am advising. I might be advising him, but I might be advising his boss, for example: suggesting to his boss that he should teach.
     

    Beth_Lee

    Member
    Chinese
    Hi everyone!

    I don't really understand why you said "It's not clear who I'm advising."
    Couldn't "I would advise him" suggest I'm giving suggestion to his boss too??

    Thank you.
     
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