I would be very grateful if you could tell me...

kate_the_student

Member
English
I would like to say -

I have sent an email but didn't receive a response. I would be very grateful if you could tell me if you have a vacancy. I have again attached a copy of my cv to this email. Hope to hear from you soon.

Here's my attempt -
Ho spedito una e-mail ma non ho ricevuto risposta. Sarò molto grato se potesse dirmi se avete un posto vacanto. Allego di nuovo a questa email una copia del mio curriculum vita.
Spero di sentirti a presto.

It's really the second sentence I'm having bother with. It doesn't seem correct to me.

Any help would be great.

Grazie in anticipo
 
  • Kuroichigo

    New Member
    Italian
    Hi! The thing about italian (that english doesn't have to deal with) is that we made a difference in the language if we talk with a friend or if we talk to someone we don't know or someone like a professor, or our chief. Yours "spero di risentirti" makes me think that you know this person pretty well, that you are his/her friend. Otherwise, "spero di risentirVi" o "spero di risertirLa" would be more appropriate. It depends if the receiver is a "society", in general [risentirVi would be ok] or a specific person [risentirLa is to be used]

    Anyway...

    Ho spedito un'email ma non ho ricevuto risposta. Sarei molto grato se poteste dirmi se avete un posto vacante. Allego di nuovo una copia del mio curriculum vitae.
    Spero di avere presto vostre notizie.
    I hope you don't get more confused, after my suggestions :p
     
    Hi, I'm new, but I thought I might help. I don't know your level, so I'll start from the basics. Consider for instance this simple english dialogue:
    "How are you?""Fine, thanks. And you?".
    The italian translation changes according to the degree of confidence between the speakers. If the speakers are friends, or at least they know each other and are at the same social level (colleagues for instance), the dialogue sounds
    "Come stai?""Bene grazie. E tu?"
    Notice that I translated you with tu. this is called "dare del tu". If the speakers are strangers the dialogue becomes
    "Come sta?""Bene grazie. E lei?"
    Notice that I translated you with lei. This is called "dare del lei", and means that you refer to the person you are talking to as if you were talking about somebody else (the literal translation of "Lei come sta" would be "how is she?", as if you were talking about another person, a woman to be precise, even if you're talking to a man).
    In many situations "dare del tu" is considered very rude.
    If you are speaking to your boss at work, you have to refer to him with "lei", while he can call you by "tu".
    Some exceptions: usually everybody "dà del tu" to a boy, even if he is a stranger. If you are in your 20s or even in your 30s and you are speaking with someone who is more or less your age, you can dargli del tu, even if you don't know him.
    In your letter, I assume you are not a friend of the recipient, so that explains the lei.
     
    Last edited:

    kate_the_student

    Member
    English
    Yes I do understand that aspect of the language thank you. Just not how what I'm trying to say is affected. I'm writing to a potential employer, clearly the polite form is required. How should the email read?

    Grazie
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    .
    Sarò molto grato se potesse dirmi se avete un posto vacanto. Allego di nuovo a questa email una copia del mio curriculum vita.
    Spero di sentirti a presto.

    Grazie in anticipo
    You have mixed all three possible forms of "you" in your email. You obviously need to be consistant and choose one from either the polite form Lei or the plural voi.
    In his post, Kuroichigo has provided a corrected version using voi which is used when writing to a company, as in your case.
    :):)
     
    You have mixed all three possible forms of "you" in your email. You obviously need to be consistant and choose one from either the polite form Lei or the plural voi.
    In his post, Kuroichigo has provided a corrected version using voi which is used when writing to a company, as in your case.
    :):)
    Exactly (even though actually "voi" can also be used to refer to a single person, and in some southern regions such as Campania, it is in fact far more popular that "lei").
    So the first thing we need to know is: are you writing to a specific person or to the company in genral?
     

    onionsalad

    Member
    Italian
    Hi Kate,
    Here is how I would change it:

    Sarò (or: Sarei) molto gratoa (if your are a woman, then you are "grata", not "grato") se potesse dirmi se avete un posto vacantoe. Allego di nuovo a questa email una copia del mio curriculum vitae.
    Spero di sentirtila a presto. (or, better: Spero di avere presto sue notizie.)
     
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