I would like two icecreams.

Gunday

Senior Member
Korean
I would like two icecreams.
I would like two icecream.
I would like two cups of icecreams.
I would like two orders of icecream.
I would like two helpings of icecream.

Which is more natureal than the others?
 
  • WestSideGal

    Senior Member
    English, US
    I would like two icecreams.
    I would like two ice cream.
    I would like two cups of ice creams. :tick:
    I would like two orders of ice cream. :tick:
    I would like two helpings of ice cream. :tick:

    Which is more natureal than the others?

    The third one is really not an option, though, when ordering ice cream at a restaurant. It is, however, what you might say at home if you were being served ice cream, maybe in answer to, "How much ice cream would you like?" "I would like two helpings, please".

    Although it is not the best English, in NYC it is very common to say "Give me (gimme) two ice creams, please."
     

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I don't like "ice cream" in the plural. If they're different ice creams sure, but that's not going to be correct all of the time.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    For the avoidance of doubt, "I would like two ice creams" is pefectly natural, at least in British English, and is what you would say in an ice cream parlour if you were buying for two people - or if you were buying two for yourself! We would never say I'd like two orders of ice cream.

    Usage varies but it appears the two most common spellings are "ice cream", as two words, or "ice-cream", hyphenated, rather than a single word.
     
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