I would surely not recommend dogs to go there.

8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
In a fictional story whose setting is in New York, I came across the following line.
1. “I would surely not recommend dogs to go there.”
A dictionary at hand says that this “recommend a person to-infinitive” pattern is British English and that in American English it is not standard. The dictionary further says that, instead of this pattern, they use “recommend that S’ V’…” pattern in the U. S. like #2 below.
2. "I would surely not recommend dogs go there."
Do you agree with this description? I would like Americans, especially, to give any comment, please.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    this “recommend a person to-infinitive” pattern is British English
    I can certainly hear British English people saying this, 8769. But I much prefer the version without the to: it's more elegant and 'feels' more correct.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    There are several previous threads which touch on this, 8769 - here's one.

    Ewie, do you use the version without "to" in the third person singular (I recommend he go?) If you do, I'd better do a post-script to my last post in the other thread... :D
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Ewie, do you use the version without "to" in the third person singular (I recommend he go?) If you do, I'd better do a post-script to my last post in the other thread... :D
    Oh I'm not sure now, Boobles, having just read 30,000 different options in the other thread. I'll have to listen out for whatever comes out of my mouth next time I use recommend:eek:

    I do think, though, that regardless of what I actually say, the to-less versions sound more elegant. (I wasn't sure if they were to-less infinitives [i.e. infinitives:D] or subjunctives.)
     
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