I would/wouldn't like to eat some/any....

Magixo

Senior Member
Croatian
Hello everybody,:)

I hope you’re all all right. :thumbsup: Well, my problem is the following: I teach the children to make sentences on what they would and wouldn’t like to eat. A picture of different sorts of food is given in their pupil’s book so they have to choose among the stuff. I teach them to make the sentences like that:

I would like to eat some chocolate cake.
I would like to eat some crisps.
I wouldn’t like to eat any frog pizza.
I wouldn’t like to eat any black ice cream.
etc

Are these sentences grammatically correct?

Thanks,
Magixo
 
  • cpowers

    Member
    America, English
    They are grammatically correct, but the negative sentences really do not need the word "any". In fact, it sounds a bit strange for me to say it in this context.

    Also, I believe (but could be wrong) that crisps is more a British word than American English. Our equivalent would be chips.

    ~Casey
     

    cpowers

    Member
    America, English
    Sorry - but I still think it sounds strange. The word "any" places emphasis on the fact that you don't even want a single bite. It is grammatically correct, but is not necessary unless you are going for the effect that the word "any" gives the sentence.

    If someone were to ask if you'd like to have some frong pizza (and they were actually offering you a piece) than you would say, "No thanks I do not care for any."

    But as Magixo phrased his sentence as just a statement someone would make, then the word "any" would most often be left out.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    It's about using "some" in positive sentences and "any" in negative sentences, isn't it?

    BTW, black ice cream? What's that?:D
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    nichec said:
    It's about using "some" in positive sentences and "any" in negative sentences, isn't it?

    BTW, black ice cream? What's that?:D


    You can make liquorice ice-cream.
    That would be black.
     

    Magixo

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Thanks everybody for answering the question. :)

    Well, if

    I wouldn’t like to eat any frog pizza. and
    I wouldn’t like to eat any black ice cream.

    sound strange to you I don’t know what to put in front of the noun black ice cream. Since there’s a picture of the food in the pupil’s book, according to some rule I should put “the” in front of “frog pizza” and “black ice cram”.

    I wouldn’t like to eat that frog pizza in the picture. OR
    I wouldn’t like to eat the frog pizza.

    But, as I meant for the homework sentences to be more general statements that should express children preferences towards different sorts of food with the help of the picture in the book, I find the use of the Indefinite article more appropriate.

    I wouldn’t like to eat a frog pizza. (Pizza is a countable noun and has the plural: pizzas)
    I wouldn’t like to eat ? black ice cream. (I don’t know what to put in the front of an uncountable noun since I can’t put “a”)

    Thanks,
    Magixo
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I argue that "any" is necessary because you wouldn't really use "wouldn't like" unless you were referring to a specific case.

    I wouldn't like any black ice cream right now, thanks.

    Otherwise, one would say "I don't like black ice cream."

    Magixo, is the sentence in the book referring to a particular instance of refusing black ice cream or to a general statement?
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    I stand by elroy, but how about replacing it with "black ice cream cone"? (it would be countable this way, wouldn't it?)
     

    CAMullen

    Senior Member
    US, English
    "Pizza" is a funny one. When you go to the pizzeria you buy "a pizza," but people seldom eat a whole pizza; instead, they eat "some pizza." But if they don't like pizza, of course they don't eat "any pizza."
     

    Magixo

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Well, I am totally confused now!

    Does the word ice-creams exist in English language? My dictionary says: no! But, my book says that you can simply say ‘I would like an ice cream, please.’ that implies that you can also say ‘I would like two ice-creams, please.

    Where do I make mistake?

    Help please
    Magixo
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Yes, you can have two ice-creams, Magixo. but the word tends to be used in conjucntion with some other word.
    Ice-cream cone/cornet would be the most usual generic term, followed by choc-ice (where the word "cream" is omitted). Other than that people would tend to ask for "two (brand name)s please", as in "two Cornettos" or "three Magnums" please.
    In a restaurant the desert might be ordered as "We'll both have the ice-cream, please."
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    In one sense, when it means the actual stuff, ice-cream is uncountable.

    In another, when it means the thing that is served to the customer, it is countable.
     

    Magixo

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Thanks for help, maxiogee! It’s obvious that the Book is right and the Babylon-Pro and Oxford dictionary is wrong. I should write to them to correct the mistake!:D

    What do they think, who are they making these dictionaries for? :mad: Just kidding! :)

    I would rather use the WordReference.com dictionary but It does not say whether a noun has the plural or not!

    Sincerely,
    Magixo
     
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