ice-cream cones

LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
Later, youths set fire to a satellite truck parked near parliament, which rolled downhill into a kiosk whose freezer exploded. Hooded youths ducked behind the burning truck to help themselves to ice-cream cones. ABCnews (no subscription)

Dear all,

Could you please explain to me what the underlined part means here? Thanks.


LQZ
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The underlined part means ... ice-cream cones. :D I imagine the kiosk sold ice-cream cones and when their freezer exploded, there were ice-cream cones right there for the taking.
     

    Inglip

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    A 99 is what we call the 'real thing.' I don't know why though.

    An ice-cream-cone for me makes me think of the actual cone without any ice cream in it.
     

    Inglip

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I would say it was.

    1. The freezer exploded. So they're scooping up the ice cream off of the floor and walls?

    2. They had to navigate a burning obstacle to get there. So the ice cream would melt, and who has time to start turning on the ice cream machine and orginising grabbing the cones, and then using the machine, when the place could likely set fire. They would also be in a rush because they 'broke in' to the store.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yeah but who in their right minds would eat dry ice cream cones? ~ I'd rather a nice bowlful of sawdust.
     

    Inglip

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    The key word is 'free' cones haha.

    And 'hooded' is also an important word. The sort of kids who hang out on street corners with hoods aren't the sort to pass up an opportunity to steal, even if it is plain ice cream cones.

    So people (hooded kids) aren't looking for anything logical, like the tasty ice cream. Some people just want to watch the world burn.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Speaking, I guess, only for myself: I would never in a million years call a cone without any ice cream in it an ice cream cone. (I wouldn't use a hyphen in ice cream, either.) I might call it a sugar cone or a cake cone, depending on which type it was, or I might just call it a cone, but it's not an ice cream cone until it has ice cream in it.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Speaking, I guess, only for myself: I would never in a million years call a cone without any ice cream in it an ice cream cone. (I wouldn't use a hyphen in ice cream, either.) I might call it a sugar cone or a cake cone, depending on which type it was, or I might just call it a cone, but it's not an ice cream cone until it has ice cream in it.
    It's the same for me, pob14. That's why it didn't occur to me that they could be stealing just the cones with no ice cream in them. I would never say, "Let's go get an ice cream cone" to mean just the cone itself.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Well, conversely (or obversely, or whatever) I wouldn't call an ice cream cone with ice cream in it an ice cream cone ~ I'd call it a(n) (ice cream) cornet ...
    A 99 is what we call the 'real thing.' I don't know why though.
    ... though I did once call them 99s. I believe the last time I heard that term, though, I was eating one while watching Noah sail away in his Ark:eek:
     

    Inglip

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Ice cream cone is the cone for the ice cream.

    If I had ice cream in a cone (With lovely sprinkles and a flake) I would say I had an ice cream. If it was in a bowl, I would say I had some ice cream.

    A 99 isn't that old, I remember eating them as a kid. We would joke how they cost 1 pound ten, but called 99. Or we joked how the ice cream man was so fat, he named them so because he can eat 99 of them.

    Actually, in the Baskins and Robins up the road, they asked me, after I chose chocolate - What ice cream cone would you like sir?
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    Usually when we refer to cones they have ice-cream in them. I would go into a shop and ask for 'a vanilla cone' for example. This is mainly to differentiate it from a tub or bowl though.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Actually, in the Baskins and Robins up the road, they asked me, after I chose chocolate - What ice cream cone would you like sir?
    Really? In mine they say "(In a) Cup or (on a) cone?" If I respond "cone" they ask "Sugar or cake?" (and now "waffle" as well, I think) They might say "What kind of cone?" but I can't imagine them saying "What kind of ice cream cone?"
     
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    Inglip

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I've never heard of a sugar or cake cone, to me, it is just a cone.

    But I live in the Middle East, and the guy was Filipino, I don't think they set the standards for English haha.
     

    mr cat

    Senior Member
    English - England
    ... though I did once call them 99s. I believe the last time I heard that term, though, I was eating one while watching Noah sail away in his Ark:eek:[/QUOTE]

    Up here in the NE Uk we still call them 99s - the ones with flakes in them and still ask for monkeys blood. :cool: and I agree, an ice cream cone is the cone, an ice cream is ice cream with a cone!
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Yeah, I'm from Warrington, and we call them 99 there. Is it just a NE thing, or the whole of England?
    Is this the generic name for any soft ice cream there? For me it would be "soft-serve" or even a "Frosty", which was the name of a chain of soft-serve ice cream stores. I think "soft-serve" would be generally understood in the U.S. I may be wrong. :)
     

    Inglip

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I don't know what soft serve is. Isn't all ice cream soft?

    To me, it is just ice cream haha.

    A 99 is specifically ice cream in a cone, often with a flake and strawberry sauce and sherbert.

    I just searched 99 in google, and the 99 ice cream on wikipedia is the first link.
     

    Jam on toast

    Senior Member
    UK
    British English
    I'd also think of an ice cream cone as the conical thing for holding the ice cream. Looking at James M's picture links, a typical ice cream cone for me would be the cake cone. I prefer them with ice cream in them, though! This is the kind of ice cream you get from ice cream vans in the UK.

    I pretty much always had a 99-flake, but if I wanted one with no flake I'd just ask for an ice-cream from the ice cream van man. I wonder about the origin of 99 - is it a commercial thing ... or am I drifting off topic too far here?
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't know what soft serve is. Isn't all ice cream soft?
    Soft-serve is the stuff that comes out of a spout; it's almost like a thick milk shake (and is most often not what I would call ice cream at all; it's actually ice milk, although they don't call it that any more). Dairy Queen is a major US purveyor of that stuff, and it looks like this.

    "Hard," or what I might call "real," ice cream is much firmer, and is generally hand-dipped from a tub. When put in a cone, it looks like this, Baskin-Robbins being the major US chain selling that kind.

    Soft-serve is most often sold in the cake-style cones, and hard can be in either cake cones, sugar cones, or waffle cones.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I don't know what soft serve is. Isn't all ice cream soft?
    No, of course not.

    "Real" ice cream is typcially kept in a freezer, and can be hard as a brick when first taken out; it may take a little bit of sitting at room temperature in order to make it soft enough to be scooped and served.

    Here is a picture of tubs of hard, frozen ice cream in the case at an ice-cream shop.
     
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    Inglip

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I've never been asked what type I wanted before, only what flavor. I just walk into the shop or Baskins and buy some. I didn't realise there was two types.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Baskin-Robbins has only recently added soft-serve ice cream as an offering. It was only "hard" ice cream in the past. They may not offer soft-serve ice cream in your Baskin-Robbins yet.
     
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