ICE / Ice (Immigration and Customs Enforcement)

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SwissPete

Senior Member
Français (CH), AE (California)
ICE / Ice (Immigration and Customs Enforcement)

In the US, it’s written ICE; in the UK it’s written Ice.

Can anyone explain why?

Thank you.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The Independent has it as ICE, Pete, eg here. So does The Telegraph: click.

    I did find an example of Ice in The Guardian. But The Guardian is famous for slip-ups; this may have been another one, rather than a policy decision.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I think the BBC uses Nato, doesn't it? But it seems to use ICE rather than Ice: example.
    I've not kept track of individual items, just noticed that since 1975, when I left the UK, more things like that have become Nato, rather than NATO (and Aids, rather than AIDS etc) and full stops/periods have disappeared from them. How the BBC or Guardian, for example decide which to change and when is beyond me:)
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Aparently they have decided that the acronyms are in such wide use that they've become words, like sonar, scuba, and radar.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I get quite peeved by journalists who mess around with perfectly good initialisms. It's NATO, for goodness sake, and the disease is AIDS. I've even seen Pc for "police constable". It's b******g ridiculous to write Nato when the BBC doesn't call itself the Bbc!

    Full stops were dropping out of government initialisms and abbreviations at least 50 years ago - they shortened the life of typewriter ribbons too much.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Now that typewriters are as good as extinct, and typewriter ribbons therefore no longer endangered, are you thinking of starting a campaign for the revival of full stops in initialisms?
    We no longer use typewriter ribbons, but the full stops (or AE periods) add length and therefore reduce the amount of content that can appear on a single screen or in a screen window. Therefore, I feel the C.F.T.R.O.F.S.I.I. is doomed to failure.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    We no longer use typewriter ribbons, but the full stops (or AE periods) add length and therefore reduce the amount of content that can appear on a single screen or in a screen window. Therefore, I feel the C.F.T.R.O.F.S.I.I. is doomed to failure.
    (I didn't mean to sidetrack the thread onto full stops/periods but note that they (mostly) persist with i.e. and e.g., although I have seen ie and eg a few times).
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It seems to me that things and organizations are in two different classes. Scuba tanks and laser pointers have become everyday objects so have turned into everyday words. That's all right by me. But organizations are still organizations and the individual words will stand for something even on an everyday basis. So no Bbc, no Ice, no Un. Can you imagine the Secretary-General of the Un?

    Do they just do that to the ones with vowels that might form pseudo-words?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I remember, many years ago, seeing full-page adverts in several newspapers, placed by the then British Airports Authority, a government organization in charge of all or most major UK airports, and which was widely known by and referred to as the B.A.A., that they had decided to change their name to BAA and that it (the name) no longer stood for anything. This may have coincided with their being privatized.

    For some strange reason, the background picture featured sheep.
     
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