Ice-skating

pidgeon

Member
English/Swedish
Hello to everyone!

I do not know any Russian but was wondering if anyone knew what any ice-skating terms are in Russian; I assume that the jumps are the same-
axel, salchow, but what about 'double axel', or 'camel spin'? and what are the names for all of the spirals, 'biellman' etc. ?

Also, do you happen to know what 'I can ice-skate' is in Russian? I really want to impress my russian coach and would appreciate any help!

Thanks,
pidgeon.
 
  • papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    Also, do you happen to know what 'I can ice-skate' is in Russian? I really want to impress my russian coach and would appreciate any help!
    In Russian to ice-skate is prononunced

    katatsa na kan'kah (кататься на коньках)
    , stressed vowel is underlined.

    where the first word is a general verb for all kinds of skating/riding/sledding, and the second specifies that it's skating on ice.

    To say I can ice-skate is :
    Ya umeyu katatsa na kan'kah (Я умею кататься на коньках).

    Hope this helps, sorry I don't know any special terminology.
     

    Lemminkäinen

    Senior Member
    Norwegian (bokmål)
    Hi pidgeon :)

    Do you know how to read Cyrillic? I think this is how you say 'I can ice-skate':

    Я умею кататься на коньках - ja omejo katatsa na kan'kakh

    The second sentence is transcribed into pseudo-phonetic Swedish - the stress is on the bold letters.

    If you want to say 'I like ice-skating', it's:

    Я люблю кататься на коньках - ja l'obl'o katatsa na kan'kakh


    ETA: Looks like I was right, then :D
     

    übermönch

    Senior Member
    World - 1.German, 2.Russian, 3.English
    So ye have a Russian coach? Damn lucky you are... All we have is some lokal old drawer who barely can talk. On the other hand there's a huge lake around which freezes every winter....
    Ок,ок enough banter :p in russian you say
    "I can ride skates" -
    "Ja umeju katats'a na kon'kach" (j=english y;ch=Greek/Scottish ch; ' indicates palatalization)
    the special terms seem to be the same, with some exeptions however. After googling them in cyrillic I stumbled upon the following glossary:
    http://www.fsonline.ru/Talks/words.html
    Bielmann's the same, the double axel is "dvoynoy aksel'", the camel spin is something completely different, "Libella"
     

    Crescent

    Senior Member
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    Hi, there, Pidgeon! :)
    It's wonderful that you want to impress you Russian coach, and that you're willing to have a go at saying the phrases/expressions in his/her own native language. I believe I can help you with a few...
    I can ice skate = Я умею кататься на коньках. (would you need the transciprtion for that in english letters? I mean, can you read cyrillic?)

    Now, I'm afraid - that's where it gets harder. Jumps, as you call them, aren't all the same in Russian. Here are a few that I have found out:

    Тулуп = Toe Loop
    Сальхов=Salchow
    Риттбергер=Loop
    Аксель=Axel
    Ойлер=Halp Loop
    Лутц=Lutz
    Флип =Flip

    I'm afraid that that's all for the moment, and I hope that does help you a little bit. In the meantime, I'll be on the look out for more, for you! :) :)P.S. Don't forget - tell us if you don't know how to pronounce them. We will do our best to make up ways (as ridiculous as they may be :p) to help you out!
    Good luck! :)

    EDIT: Ahh! Turns out while I was taking my time to type my answer up, three people (!!!) have managed to post before me. So that explains why I have ''repeated'' (due to now fault of my own :D, may I add) some answers.. Sorry!
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Тулуп = Toe Loop
    That's my favourite one! Not the jump but the name. :) The English term was deliberately mistransliterated so it would coinside with the Russian тулуп, the word for a warm winter coat that many used to wear a hundred years ago. Here is one, for example.
     

    maxl

    Senior Member
    Hebrew, Israel
    That's my favourite one! Not the jump but the name. :) The English term was deliberately mistransliterated so it would coinside with the Russian ?????, the word for a warm winter coat that many used to wear a hundred years ago. Here is one, for example.
    Hey, isn't that Ivan the Terrible's coat? looks familiar.
     

    Crescent

    Senior Member
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    Hey, isn't that Ivan the Terrible's coat? looks familiar.
    LOL! :p I doubt that it's his exact coat, the one which he wore when at the throne, but it's not impossible.. :p

    Anyway, back to ice-skating! Cyanista - I guess you're a fan too, just like mee! :D I didn't know that they coincided the english name with the russian! I would have thought that it was the opposite way around, no? It's usually like that.
    What does a toe loop look like then? See, the problem is, I know what the elements are called, but I don't actually know what they look like..(or most of them. I mean, obviously I've seen axels plenty of times because they are the most popular.)
    Does anybody know, by the way, what it's called when they spin really really fast, at first sitting down, and then standing up..and it just looks so very pretty! I think our Irinochka Slutskaya does it better than anyone! :D :D
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Тулуп = Toe Loop
    Сальхов=Salchow
    Риттбергер=Loop
    Аксель=Axel
    Ойлер=Halp Loop
    Лутц=Lutz
    Флип =Flip
    quote]

    Once watching ice-skating I heard commentator say “ пробежка ”. Unfortunaly I don’t know it’s English translation. “Ritberg” was also mentioned.
     

    Bazhena

    Member
    Russian, Russian Federation
    To Crescent: When they spin sitting down it’s called “sit spin” («волчок»). When they stand up and spin supporting a leg above the head with hands – it’s “Bielmann spin” («бильман»).

    P.S. Join your Ice-Skating Fans Club :)



    To dec-sev. I would suggest that "перебежка" (="подсечка") was the word you heard.
     

    Crescent

    Senior Member
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    To Crescent: When they spin sitting down it’s called “sit spin” («волчок»). When they stand up and spin supporting a leg above the head with hands – it’s “Bielmann spin” («бильман»).

    P.S. Join your Ice-Skating Fans Club :)

    .
    Hello there! Looks like we have a real ice skating fan here! ;)Thank you very much for the explanation and the information. :) Now every time my parents and I watch the Stars in Ice show, I can proudly point these new elements out to them. :D
    То есть, если я правильно поняла, то в большенстве случаев, делаеться сначало волчок, а потом фигурист как-бы выпрямляется, и исполняет так-называемый: бильман.
    Спасибо ещё раз, Bezhena! :)
     

    Bazhena

    Member
    Russian, Russian Federation
    to dec-sev: I've read the description of the element called "пробежка" in the book from the link. It's the same element as подсечка/перебежка (actually, these two names are mainly used).to Crescent: хочу уточнить на всякий случай: не всякое вращение в положении стоя - бильман. бильман - это только когда фигурист вращается на одной ноге, а вторую поднимает назад и держит её за лезвие конька двумя руками над головой.
     
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