Icelandic: á eftir

ShakeyX

Senior Member
British English
Been told that á eftir can mean... "going". Not sure if that is relevant to what follows but anyone want to confirm that.

Anyway saw this and cannot work it out... I'll give an attempt though.


"Hljómar vel, við höfum ekki gott af meira áti" - Sounds good, we would have not good (it would not be good for us) to eat more? by more food?

"Þessi veitingastaður minn á eftir að mala gull!" - This restaurant (of mine) going to... crush gold?
 
  • Yeah it just means that something will come in the future. Related to the 'after' meaning but I'd say the translation was more: still has to / has yet to.
    If someone moves to America to hopefully get famous in some movie career or something and his friends talk about him back home then you can say something like: Hann er aukaleikari í sjónvarpsþætti en á eftir að meika það if you wanted to be a bit "sletty" to mean "He's an extra in a TV show and is still yet to make it big."

    So in that last example it means it will mala gull (yeah, basically make a lot of money)after (it's still to come... it's going to do that). It can also be used with a nuance of 'will end up doing something' like you're giving a warning. You see this a lot when used with the verb 'regret' (að eiga eftir að sjá eftir einherju - X will end up regretting something). Icelanders use a lot of extreme metaphors in colloquial speech I've noticed. I suppose language/country has a selection of people that typically do that but yeah it's quite prevalent here. I heard one a few days ago that's just very typical, "Skellum okkur í bío!" (Crash ourselves into the cinema) which has now become sort of normalised to a slang way to say 'let's go somewhere' but obviously a bit stronger than that. Even the once-extreme geðveikur to describe new 'sick' fads is losing the impact it once had. That's how languages change though. Just look what happened to 'amazing' and 'awesome' in English.

    Edit: yeah I think you got the meaning with the 'eating more won't do us any good' line.
     
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    Haha yeh I have heard geðveikur quite alot.

    About the "is still yet to make it" does it imply some sort of... he is on his way, that is to come... or more of a state, that he had a goal, and that has not been achieved. Is it denoting a path that is on its way or that might never come?
     
    Haha yeh I have heard geðveikur quite alot.

    About the "is still yet to make it" does it imply some sort of... he is on his way, that is to come... or more of a state, that he had a goal, and that has not been achieved. Is it denoting a path that is on its way or that might never come?

    I think it expresses the fact it's being worked towards, yes.
    It's putting a future unachieved goal and saying that is what's being aimed towards, whether the person thinks it's likely or not is, I think, not expressed.
    I'm just going on instinct here though. You'll need native confirmation on that.
     
    @ Alex: Regards the 'crash' bit. It is now common in English to say you will 'smash' something i.e 'tonight we will smash a few beers', which is obviously a similar thing. Do you think it is just an Icelandisation of that?
     
    @ Alex: Regards the 'crash' bit. It is now common in English to say you will 'smash' something i.e 'tonight we will smash a few beers', which is obviously a similar thing. Do you think it is just an Icelandisation of that?
    It's not anything related to specific languages, it's just a process that happens to nearly every language. Expressions always become weaker and we pull in stronger ones to regain the effect after we're used to the weakened nuance in the older form we used and it just cycles through. Majority of the time in slang it splits and goes down its own path (exactly like the smash/destroy things we/people use for big drinking sessions) and that's not likely to change the whole definition, because it's kind of metaphorical and typical of a phase of younger people who then stop saying certain things. It's a human thing to do to language and both things are happening by themselves, not that one thing is having an effect on another. Good observation, though. There seems to be a trend to come up with the most ridiculous way to express something for comic effect in this day and age, definitely noticed that. The media does this all the time. I watched all the coverage leading up to the last US election and some of the ways that the media was referring to banal, boring policy debate was hilarious. Rightly poked fun at on other shows. There will be a time when catastrophic can be used when you've forgotten your keys at home or something equally non-catastrophic today. Might be going a bit off-topic here. :)
     
    Ah okay. I have an Icelandic mate who says they tend to hear English things and then translate it into Icelandic, just wondered if it was one of those things. This forum always makes me realise how hard this language is :(

    I work in a supermarket part-time as well as being a student - and you're not far off. Not having a product is 'an absolute disgrace'.

    Anyway, you're right, off topic.
     
    "Hljómar vel, við höfum ekki gott af meira áti" - Sounds good, we would have not good (it would not be good for us) to eat more? by more food?
    Is "áti" what confused you? It's the noun "át" and is "the act of eating" or something like that.
     
    Just the whole thing is a bit of a wierd construction in english I find. Literally "I would have not good by more eating?" which makes no sense, I didn't know the best way to translate it.
     
    I think it expresses the fact it's being worked towards, yes.
    It's putting a future unachieved goal and saying that is what's being aimed towards, whether the person thinks it's likely or not is, I think, not expressed.
    I'm just going on instinct here though. You'll need native confirmation on that.

    Not a native, but..... yes and no. In this case ("Þessi veitingastaður á eftir að mala gull") it is meant that the restaurant will make a lot of money, it is something that is expected to happen in the future. If you say that an actor "á eftir að meika það" it's the same thing, it is a strong prediction that the actor will make it big. Hann á eftir að sjá eftir þessu means, as you correctly say, that he will end up regretting this. In these cases it's basically only a little bit weaker than saying hann mun sjá eftir þessu, for example.

    You can also use it to talk about tasks that someone has left to do.

    Ertu búinn að þrífa íbúðina þína? Have you finished cleaning your flat?
    Næstum því, ég á eftir að sópa gólfið. Nearly, I just have to mop the floor.

    Ertu búinn að skila ritgerðinni? Have you handed in the essay?
    Nei ég á eftir að skrifa hana. No, I haven't written it yet.

    In these cases you are not really making a prediction in the same way, but you are still talking about something that will happen, because it's implied that you have to do something but haven't done so yet.
     
    I think I have two more examples, both found on page 176 of Olly Richards' Short Stories in Icelandic for Beginners (Teach Yourself). John Murray Press. Kindle Edition.

    Þetta á án efa eftir að hjálpa ferli mínum!
    "This is definitely going to help my career!", according to Google Translate.​
    "This will definitely help my career!", according to Microsoft Translate.​

    Ég reikna með að það eigi eftir að stuðla að hagnaði.
    "I reckon it will contribute to profits.", according to Google Translate.​
    "I reckon it's going to contribute to profits.", according to Microsoft Translate.​

    I'm hoping to get these machine translations confirmed by a human native Icelandic speaker.

    Also, I'm wondering if a better title for this thread would be something like "að eiga eftir". Can a moderator change it?

    Thanks!
     
    These translations seem fine. I have no preference for either "going to" or "will" for them but that might be more due to me not quite grasping the different nuances in English. Silver biscuit was right in saying "á eftir" in this context is only just weaker than "mun".
     
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