Icelandic : song Glóðir (Villtir Strengir)

mexpat15

New Member
English - US
Hi, Here's my 3rd of three song questions for the forum! Love this song found on youtube, and online I've found words to it in Icelandic, and it's OK to translate for the most part. Two issues :

Þegar dalinn sveipa húmtjöld hljóð : can anyone help with this? When the valley -
wraps up ?
húm dusk?
tjöld tents?
hljóð sound


And then ... if anyone listens to this song ... There is a last verse that is not on any of the pages of lyrics I found. He seems to refer to what is most fixed in his memory, perhaps what he celebrates, then what he misses most, and I think the last is something like "the sound of this means longing". Well, a lot to ask, but perhaps someone else will love this song and want to decipher it?

Thanks for any guidance.
 
  • Segorian

    Senior Member
    Icelandic & Swedish
    This line is often written Þegar Dalinn sveipa…, considering that the valley in question is undoubtedly Herjólfsdalur in Heimaey (where the songwriter lived), a place often referred to simply as Dalurinn.

    Here, dalinn is the accusative form of dalurinn. Húm = dusk. The adjective hljóður means ‘silent’. The structure of the sentence is: Þegar hljóð húmtjöld sveipa dalinn. “When the silent veils of dusk cover the valley.”

    As for the last verse of the lyrics, it seems to me that the entire text is to be found here.
     

    mexpat15

    New Member
    English - US
    Segorian, You are so kind! I have just see that you answered all 3 of my posts and I'm so touched.

    Thank you for that line! I had the idea of dusky curtains ... Well, needed help.

    And I do appreciate the link to Icelandic lyrics, but it's quite like I had seen. I have no credentials in this language but I swear the last verse he sings < --- > is not in that text, or any other. I sound crazy, but it is easy to follow the lyrics as he sings .. until the last verse - which gets repeated, as the whole thing is repeated -

    Curious what you'll say if you listen and read, but you have already given me such good help and so much of your time, that would only be for if it is of interest to you as well, or if you like the singer or song.

    thanks with my kindest regards

    < Video link removed. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Segorian

    Senior Member
    Icelandic & Swedish
    I found what you are referring to. It is a version that I wasn't aware of, and which hasn't been issued on CD. The last line of the final verse is ómar þessir segja frá. It's another case of reversed word order: Þessir ómar segja frá [whatever is being referred to in the preceding line].

    A historical nugget:

    Both Glóðir and Ágústnótt have links to the Westman Islands and the Þjóðhátíð, a festival held there on the weekend preceding the first Monday in August (which is a public holiday). Both are by Oddgeir Kristjánsson, who wrote songs specifically for the festival most years between the early 1930s and the mid-60s, collaborating with various lyricists. A number of these songs have become standards of the popular repertoire.
     

    mexpat15

    New Member
    English - US
    Thank you again! I will work on getting that extra verse.
    Appreciate the additional note. Context is always of interest! On you tube I have heard many songs from the festival, and looked it up; read that one year when it was impossible to come from the Westman Islands to the mainland to join in the national holiday celebrations, the islanders stuck at home created their own festival, which has now grown to be its own national event. Looks fantastic.
     
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