Ich bin (ein) Cop

Maranello_rosso

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone!
Could you please help me?
I'm watching "The little things" and I have heard a such answer :

Ich bin ein Cop.

Here is a context:

- Sind Sie auf bei der Mordkommission?
- Nein, nein ma'am. Ich bin ein Cop.

And my questions is why there is "ein" before "Cop"?
I know that professions we say without any article, like I bin Arzt.


Thank you in advance.
 
  • berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    There isn't really much of a difference in terms of meaning. There is a certain difference in emphasis. Without article the emphasis is on the profession and the/or the qualifications needed without any reference to other people of the same profession while the version with indefinite article puts the emphasis on being part of a group. Here it means something like "No, I am one of the other people working here".
     

    Frieder

    Senior Member
    And you have to consider that the words should be roughly lip-sychronous. The original would be "I'm a cop" so they dubbed it "ich bin ein Cop" because it fits the lip movement.

    That said, I don't agree with
    There is nothing wrong with Ich bin ein Arzt either.
    This sounds utterly weird to me and I'd never say "ich bin ein Arzt".

    The only situation I could imagine: There are 100 people in one room and it is general knowledge that there are 3 physicians among them. Then I could ask "ich bin ein Arzt, aber wo sind die anderen beiden?". So that's only a .00000005% situation.

    Standard situation (most likely to be found in movies):
    "Ist ein Arzt hier? Wir brauchen einen Arzt!"
    "Ich bin Arzt!"
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    So that's only a .00000005% situation.
    Yes, that was my point:
    In most cases, it just isn't what you want to say
    The issue is not the grammatical construct but the meaning it carries and the likelihood of encountering the different contexts in real life speech situations.

    Besides, if you ponder a bit I am sure you will find more context where Ich bin ein Arzt would be possible. Here are two examples:
    Ich bin eine Arzt aus München.
    Ich bin ein Arzt und kein Zauberer.
    (You could also say Ich bin Arzt und nicht Zauberer. Both versions are idiomatic.)
     
    Last edited:

    Frieder

    Senior Member
    Aber genau betrachtet war "bin ein Arzt" nie sonderlich populär und "ist ein Arzt" beinhaltet auch Fragen wie "ist ein Arzt anwesend?" also würde ich das auch als nicht überbewerten.
     

    Sowka

    Forera und Moderatorin
    German, Northern Germany
    Ich würde normalerweise bei Berufsbezeichnungen den Artikel weglassen. "Ich bin Ärztin". "Ich bin Lehrerin".

    Bei dem "Ich bin ein Cop" aus dem OP schwingt für mich eine Charakterisierung als Typ mit, die über die reine Berufsbezeichnung hinausgeht.

    So wie "ein Stahlarbeiter", dem man nicht mit irgendwelchen Bürojobs kommen kann.
     

    Alemanita

    Senior Member
    German, Germany
    Ich würde normalerweise bei Berufsbezeichnungen den Artikel weglassen. "Ich bin Ärztin". "Ich bin Lehrerin".

    Bei dem "Ich bin ein Cop" aus dem OP schwingt für mich eine Charakterisierung als Typ mit, die über die reine Berufsbezeichnung hinausgeht.

    So wie "ein Stahlarbeiter", dem man nicht mit irgendwelchen Bürojobs kommen kann.

    Kommt in diesem Fall nicht hinzu, dass Cop kein deutsches Wort bzw. keine deutsche Berufsbezeichnung ist?
    (Es ist ja quasi unvermeidbar, dass bei amerikanischen Krimis im TV und sonstwo die Rangbezeichnungen (detective, lieutenant, commissioner, cörnel) übernommen werden).
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Just as note for readers: This is a joke and certainly not a possible German word (colonel).

    dass Cop kein deutsches Wort bzw. keine deutsche Berufsbezeichnung
    Genau so ist es. "Cop" würde wohl kein deutscher Polizist in so einem Fall sagen. Der ganze Satz ist ziemlich verünglückt und wohl wirklich der Synchronisation geschuldet.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Genau so ist es. "Cop" würde wohl kein deutscher Polizist in so einem Fall sagen. Der ganze Satz ist ziemlich verünglückt und wohl wirklich der Synchronisation geschuldet.
    Klar, aber angesichts der Tatsache, dass der Film amerikanisch ist, ist "Cop" wieder nicht akzeptabel?
     

    Frieder

    Senior Member
    Natürlich ist "Cop" in amerikanischen Filmen akzeptabel – vielleicht auch, weil man sich mittlerweile daran gewöhnt hat. Wer viel französische Filme sieht, wird vielleicht auch "Flic" akzeptabel finden.

    Aber "ich bin ein Cop" finde ich nicht akzeptabel.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Aber "ich bin ein Cop" finde ich nicht akzeptabel.
    Apart from that, the elephant in the room for me was that Nein, nein ma'am. Ich bin ein Cop. is nonsensical as an answer to the question
    Sind Sie au[ch] bei der Mordkommission?
    After all members of the homicide squad are cops, too. But, well. Such blatently wrong use of words has become fashionable in in German police drama series. E.g., there is a program called Soko Leipzig, which clearly shows that whoever created the title didn't have the faintest idea what Soko means.
     

    Frieder

    Senior Member
    Yes, but it's a widely held belief. Obviously the speaker wants to explain that he is not a member of the homicide squat but a patrol officer. So he says:
    - Nein, nein ma'am. Ich bin ein Cop.
    The German word would be Streifenpolizist.
     
    Top