Ich bin in Köln, und hier gehts grad um die Wurst, sage ich.

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Frajank

Senior Member
English
Ich bin in Koeln und hier gehts grad um die Wurst sage ich.
This was the original comment...

and it was followed by this reply...

...und a proposito wurst: alles hat ein ende...

Is the reference to 'Wurst' some German idiom?

Can anyone shed any light on it please?
 
  • Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    It's indeed an idiom. It's used to say that something is at stake, at a sports event for example.

    I've found "It's neck or nothing" in English.

    ...und apropos Wurst: Alles hat ein Ende...
    That's a reference to a German carnival song "Alles hat ein Ende nur die Wurst hat zwei" (Everthing's got an end only the saugage has got two) :D
     
    Last edited:

    Frajank

    Senior Member
    English
    "hier gehts grad um die Wurst"

    I'm still finding it difficult to see exactly what was meant by this.... the writer was saying they'd had a good term at university....
     

    ABBA Stanza

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    "hier gehts grad um die Wurst"

    I'm still finding it difficult to see exactly what was meant by this.... the writer was saying they'd had a good term at university....
    Since when does there being something at stake (e.g., examinations) impair a student's ability to have a good term? Furthermore, the person used the qualifier "gerade" (= currently / right now), maybe implying that things weren't so intense at the start of the term.

    I haven't heard "It's neck or nothing" before.
    Neither have I.

    Cheers,
    Abba
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Having an exam where everything is at stake (which indeed, of course, is meant by this German idiom here) of course does not indicate at all whether a student has had a good or bad term so far (as far as exams is concerned); or even - if anything then the idiom "es geht um die Wurst" means that exams so far weren't too good and that this one now is the decisive one where one hopes to reach a turning point for the better (but even this of course isn't expressed by the idiom per se - it's only that this context may occur more frequently with this specific idiom, in this specific context, than the other way round).

    I think, insofar as I understand the English idiom correctly :), that "it's do or die now" indeed would be a good translation for "es geht um die Wurst".
     
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