ich habe es nicht präpariert gehabt...

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gramster

Member
English - USA
In the story Die Verlobung by Ludwig Thoma, the narrator says "Ich habe aber den Nepos nicht präpariert gehabt und konnte nicht übersetzen."

My question is about the construction "ich habe es nicht präpariert gehabt".

Is this equivalent to "ich hatte es nicht präpariert"?

Also is this sort of thing customary?
 
  • Resa Reader

    Senior Member
    Yes, you would hear constructions like that in Bavarian dialect. If you wrote something like that at school, though, it would be marked as a misktake (even in Bavaria ;))
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I use it, too. But they often correct me.
    Especially I was interested in the form, "ich hatte es nicht präpariert gehabt."

    I know it from a dialect area near bavaria in the south of Thuringia (südlicher Thüringer Wald) with underlying "Itzgründisch" - but it is used in the non-dialect coll. language.

    I agree with ablativ, but mostly it is used in the south.

    I searched for a long time to find a description. But almost all answers said only that it is wrong. That is why the teacher marked it as mistake.

    But I think this is too short a thinking.

    It gives the opportunity to express a special nuance.

    "Ich habe es nicht präpariert gehabt." in the past. Mostly: It was not ready, but I should have made it ready.
    "Ich hatte es nicht präpariert." It was not ready. (neutral)

    Often it refers to a special time in the past.

    "Ich habe es präpariert gehabt." Often the context is: I made it ready, but now it is not available. It was ready in the past, but now it is not ready. I prepared it.
    "Ich habe es präpariert." neutral - It could have been ready or not. I prepared it. or I was preparing it. or I have prepared it.
     
    Last edited:

    gramster

    Member
    English - USA
    "Ich habe es präpariert gehabt." Often the context is: I made it ready, but now it is not available.
    In spoken English I would accomplish that nuance by putting extra stress on the word "had" in the phrase "I had prepared it", and probably precede the phrase with a drawn-out "well...".
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    In spoken English I would accomplish that nuance by putting extra stress on the word "had" in the phrase "I had prepared it", and probably precede the phrase with a drawn-out "well...".
    The same method can be used in standard German.

    Ich habe es präpariert ...
    or (to find an equivalent to "well"
    Aber ich habe es präpariert ...


    "ich habe es nicht präpariert gehabt".

    This may may be "aber ich war das nicht ..." in certain context.
     
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