Ich werde mir ihn/ihn mir ansehen

herrkeinname

Senior Member
Polish
Der Film ist sehr interessant. Ich werde mir ihn/ihn mir ansehen. "Mir ihn" klingt besser, oder? Sind beide Möglichkeiten korrekt?
 
  • gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Der Film ist sehr interessant. Ich werde mir ihn/ihn mir ansehen. "Mir ihn" klingt besser, oder? Sind beide Möglichkeiten korrekt?
    When there are two pronouns, back-to-back, one accusative and the other dative, it's always a good percentage "guess" to put the accusative first.

    That seems to apply to reflexive forms too.

    We had a discussion about such reflexive verbs very recently:

    Ich höre/sehe es [mir] an.

    In very simple sentences, the reflexive pronoun is very often omitted. But when a more complex structure is used, generally the pronoun seems to be included. I have no idea why. I think it's just an "it is what it is" situation in German structure:

    Ich habe es mir angehört.
    Ich habe es mir angesehen.

    I hope others will correct me if my information is wrong.

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    What exactly does "Ich werde mir ihn/ihn mir ansehen" mean? Thanks!
    It's reflexive. Simply eliminate "mir" entirely from the sentence and then analyze it in English.

    Ihn refers to "der Film".

    I'm going to [will] see it [ihn, den Film]

    For now merely recognize that this additional pronoun is necessary in German. :)

    Gaer
     

    herrkeinname

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Ich habe es mir angesehen ist sicherlich richtig.
    Ich habe mir es angesehen ist sicherlich falsch :D

    Aber in den von mir angeführten Sätzen scheinen beide Versionen richtig zu sein. Wenn ich mich nur für eine entscheiden müsste, würde ich "mir ihn" wählen. Leider kann ich keine grammatische Regel finden.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Ich habe es mir angesehen ist sicherlich richtig.
    Ich habe mir es angesehen ist sicherlich falsch :D

    Aber in den von mir angeführten Sätzen scheinen beide Versionen richtig zu sein. Wenn ich mich nur für eine entscheiden müsste, würde ich "mir ihn" wählen. Leider kann ich keine grammatische Regel finden.
    Such "rules" in any language are just an attempt to "regularize" the order of words.

    Results 1 - 10 of about 629 for "Ich werde ihn mir ansehen".
    Results 1 - 5 of about 12 for "Ich werde mir ihn ansehen".

    That kind of result is only useful to me when I am investigating usage in English. More frequent, even MUCH more frequent, does not prove anything by itself.

    I hope other "natives" will give their opinions. I do not use German actively, so my suggestions are always given with that in mind. :)

    Gaer
     

    JohnUS77

    Member
    USA, English
    Thanks, Gaer. However, I have always thought that a reflexive verb only occurcs when the the subject is also the receiver of the action. :-?
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Thanks, Gaer. However, I have always thought that a reflexive verb only occurcs when the the subject is also the receiver of the action. :-?
    No. This is incorrect, if I have understood your question.

    Let me give you some really basic sentences. They may be clunky or clumsy, but I want to keep them simple:

    Supposing I said:

    I am interested in the German language.
    Ich interessiere mich für die deutsche Sprache

    I interest myself for the German language.

    Am I receiving any action here? No. If anything, I doing something to myself. I'm "interesting myself", "stimulating myself."

    We do the same thing, but with different verbs:

    I'm pushing myself to learn German.

    When the verb does not take an article, in general it takes an accusative pronoun. (Don't worry about exceptions. Just get the concept.)

    There are other verbs that do take a direct object, and that is where German and English sound very different:

    ich putze mir die Zähne.
    I clean myself the teeth. (I clearn/am clearning my teeth.)

    German adds the reflexive, now dative, then uses "the" instead of a possessive pronoun.

    Ich wasche mir die Hände.
    I'm wash myself the hands=I'm washing my hands.

    This is not too bad: link

    My suggestion would be to ask about specific verbs, one by one. The purpose of these forums is to answer one question at a time, and I think that if you continue to ask question about specific verbs, gradually you will see a pattern. I did not understand these verbs at all when I first read about them, and I could not answer questions right to save my life. Over time I absorbed basic principles, and later I could pass grammar tests effortlessly, although that was quite some time ago.

    Did this help or confuse you?

    Gaer
     

    EvilWillow

    Senior Member
    German (Germany)
    Aber in den von mir angeführten Sätzen scheinen beide Versionen richtig zu sein. Wenn ich mich nur für eine entscheiden müsste, würde ich "mir ihn" wählen.
    Ich würde mich für "ihn mir" entscheiden. ;)

    Auf die Schnelle habe ich nur Folgendes gefunden:

    Pronomen (im Dativ und Akkusativ) stehen direkt hinter dem konjugierten Verb. Das Akkusativpronomen steht vor dem Dativpronomen (gilt auch für Reflexivpronomen). Das gilt auch für die Umstellung. Nur wenn das Subjekt ein Pronomen ist, bleibt es in der Position III.

    Der Lehrer gab dem Schüler das Buch vor dem Unterricht.
    Der Lehrer gab ihm das Buch vor dem Unterricht.
    Der Lehrer gab es dem Schüler vor dem Unterricht.
    Der Lehrer gab es ihm vor dem Unterricht.

    Vor dem Unterricht gab ihm der Lehrer das Buch.
    Vor dem Unterricht gab es ihm der Lehrer.
    Vor dem Unterricht gab er es ihm.
     

    herrkeinname

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Aus der Regel ergibt sich folgendes:

    Ich habe mir einen neuen Wagen gekauft.
    1. Ich habe mir ihn gekauft.:cross:
    2. Ich habe ihn mir gekauft.:tick:
    Ich habe mir den Mann anders vorgestellt.
    1. Ich habe mir ihn anders vorgestellt.:cross:
    2. Ich habe ihn mir anders vorgestellt.:tick:
    Ich dachte immer, zuerst ginge der Dativ und erst dann der Akkusativ. Ganz bestimmt würde ich die ersten Sätze nicht für falsch halten.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Aus der Regel ergibt sich folgendes:

    Ich habe mir einen neuen Wagen gekauft.

    1. Ich habe mir ihn gekauft.:cross:
    2. Ich habe ihn mir gekauft.:tick:
    Ich habe mir den Mann anders vorgestellt.

    1. Ich habe mir ihn anders vorgestellt.:cross:
    2. Ich habe ihn mir anders vorgestellt.:tick:
    Ich dachte immer, zuerst ginge der Dativ und erst dann der Akkusativ. Ganz bestimmt würde ich die ersten Sätze nicht für falsch halten.
    I was looking at a couple possible examples:

    Results 1 - 10 of about 70 for "Ich habe es mir anders vorgestellt".
    Results 1 - 9 of about 17 for "Ich habe mir es anders vorgestellt".

    Results 1 - 6 of 6 for "Hast Du es Dir anders vorgestellt".
    Results 1 - 2 of 2 for "Hast Du Dir es anders vorgestellt".

    I'm surprised at how often the dative appears first, although it is always a minority of hits. I think this has been discussed before, and perhaps emphasis allows the order to be reversed without sounding or looking wrong, but it seems strange to me that way.

    Gaer
     

    EvilWillow

    Senior Member
    German (Germany)
    Ich dachte immer, zuerst ginge der Dativ und erst dann der Akkusativ.
    Beachte, dass im oben zitierten Satz von Akkusativ- und Dativpronomen die Rede ist! Ohne Zweifel gilt:

    Ich leihe Peter (Nomen im Dativ) das Buch (Nomen im Akkusativ). :tick:
    Ich leihe das Buch Peter. :cross:

    Ich schaue mir (Reflexivpronomen im Dativ) den Film (Nomen im Akkusativ) an. :tick:
    Ich schaue den Film mir an. :cross:

    Aber:

    Ich habe ihn (Akkusativpronomen) mir (Reflexivpronomen im Dativ) gekauft. :tick:
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Beachte, dass im oben zitierten Satz von Akkusativ- und Dativpronomen die Rede ist! Ohne Zweifel gilt:
    Let me use your examples to show you the rules I learned. If I'm wrong, please correct me.

    Usually the shortest way possible to construct such sentences in English is the same as the correct way in German for very elementary structures, so those who know English can actually use it.

    1) Two nouns, dative first
    2) A pronoun and noun, pronoun first
    3) Two pronouns, accusative first

    D=Dative, dative
    A=Akkusativ, accusative

    1) D/A (two nouns, dative first)
    I'm lending Peter the book.
    Ich leihe Peter das Buch.
    ("I'm lending the book to Peter" is correct but the longer way.)

    2a) D/A (pronoun, noun—pronoun comes first)
    I'm lending him the book.
    Ich leihe ihm das Buch.
    ("I'm lending book to him" is correct in English but the longer way.) :warn:

    2b) A/D (pronoun, noun—pronoun comes first)
    I'm lending it to Peter.
    Ich leihe es Peter.
    ("I'm lending Peter it" is wrong :warn: )

    3) A/D (two pronouns, accusative first)
    I'm lending it to him.
    Ich leihe es ihm.
    ("I'm lending him it" is extremely rare and normally simply wrong. :warn: )

    So other sentences, using reflexive, usually follow the same rules:

    2) prounoun first, noun second
    Ich schaue mir (Reflexivpronomen im Dativ) den Film (Nomen im Akkusativ) an.

    3) two pronouns, accusative first
    Ich habe ihn (Akkusativpronomen) mir (Reflexivpronomen im Dativ) gekauft.
     

    herrkeinname

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Wir haben schon festgestellt, wie der Satz gestaltet werden soll. Und im Duden habe ich etwas Merkwürdiges gefunden, was die soeben erwähnte Regel widerlegt, und zwar:

    Ich habe mir ihn zum Vorbild gewählt.

    © Duden - Deutsches Universalwörterbuch 2001
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Wir haben schon festgestellt, wie der Satz gestaltet werden soll. Und im Duden habe ich etwas Merkwürdiges gefunden, was die soeben erwähnte Regel widerlegt, und zwar:

    Ich habe mir ihn zum Vorbild gewählt.

    © Duden - Deutsches Universalwörterbuch 2001
    As you know, from the very start I wondered about such structures myself. What does this mean, for instance?

    Results 1 - 10 of about 113 for "mir dich zum Vorbild".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 22 for "dich mir zum Vorbild".

    Perhaps this means nothing. Perhaps it reflects wrong usage. But perhaps is shows that this "rule", accusative first when there are two pronouns, is not quite the end of it.

    I'm as curious as you are. :)

    Gaer
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Google:
    "habe ihn mir" 97.000
    "habe mir ihn" 523

    Die Reihenfolge der Objekte ist im Deutschen nicht immer streng geregelt. Es gibt Fälle, in denen nur eine Möglichkeit korrekt ist, aber in vielen Fällen kommt es auch auf die von dem Sprecher gewünschte Betonung der Objekte an. Akkusativ-Objekte transitiver Verben stehen z.B. fast immer nach den Dativobjekten (und meist vor eventuellen Präpositionalobjekten):

    Der Lehrer gibt den Schülern ihre Hausaufgaben.

    Ist das Akkusativobjekt ein Pronomen, so muß es jedoch dem Dativobjekt vorausgehen:

    Der Lehrer gibt sie den Schülern. <richtig> (sie = die Hausaufgaben)
    Der Lehrer gibt den Schülern sie. <falsch! nicht einmal als Ausnahme denkbar>

    Hier ist ein interessanter Link für Sprachschüler. (pdf-Dokument)

    Kajjo
     

    longbow

    Senior Member
    ITALY & GERMANY (mothertongues)
    lots of things have already been said...

    As a native speaker...
    I just would like to add:

    I sehe IHN MIR an.

    Ich werde IHN MIR ansehen.

    Ich sehe es mir an.
    ---
    BUT:
    Ich sehe MIR etwas (something) an.
    ---

    CIAO
    Happy new YEAR!
    Frohes neues Jahr!
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Google:
    "habe ihn mir" 97.000
    "habe mir ihn" 523

    Die Reihenfolge der Objekte ist im Deutschen nicht immer streng geregelt. Es gibt Fälle, in denen nur eine Möglichkeit korrekt ist, aber in vielen Fällen kommt es auch auf die von dem Sprecher gewünschte Betonung der Objekte an.
    That's what I thought. I think students (on almost any level) are better off following the "default" rules. I would, if I wrote or spoke German. I would also expect "natives" to break rules according to "feel".
    Akkusativ-Objekte transitiver Verben stehen z.B. fast immer nach den Dativobjekten (und meist vor eventuellen Präpositionalobjekten):

    Der Lehrer gibt den Schülern ihre Hausaufgaben.
    It is the same in English here:

    The teacher gives/is giving the students/pupils their assignments [homework].
    Ist das Akkusativobjekt ein Pronomen, so muß es jedoch dem Dativobjekt vorausgehen:

    Der Lehrer gibt sie den Schülern. <richtig> (sie = die Hausaufgaben)
    Der Lehrer gibt den Schülern sie. <falsch! nicht einmal als Ausnahme denkbar>
    This is also wrong in English:

    The teacher is giving the students them. :cross:
    Hier ist ein interessanter Link für Sprachschüler. (pdf-Dokument)
    This part interested me:

    "B: Rhema am Ende des Mittelfeldes"

    I don't know what "Rhema" means, but the sentences shown with pink words in the "chart" below seem to show the way normal order is reversed for emphasis. This matches (I think) what I've seen in the past.

    Many thanks, Kajjo!

    Gaer
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top