I'd be stayin' in my bed a day wae that wee cracker

brusx

New Member
polish
Good morning,
Could anyone tell me what is the meaning of the the second part of the phrase?

"I'd be stayin' in my bed a day wae that wee cracker"

It derives from a Sctottish thriller novel "Dark suits and sad songs"
Context. People are laughing at a man of whom they know he is involved in an "illicit affair"
"Can you see how tired looking he is?....No wonder, I'd be stayin' in my bed a day wae that wee cracker"

Thank you very much
 
  • AWeeCracker

    New Member
    American English
    The expression "a wee cracker" is also used in referring to a little girl (Samantha Gates) in the 2003 film "Water Babies" with James Mason. The story is set in 1850, using a lot of old expressions, so I wonder if the expression is still used today.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I know 'cracker' as meaning a very attractive woman. I wouldn't say it has any derogatory tinge and I wouldn't be surprised if it's old fashioned. I'm from North East England just before Scotland. There's quite a lot of language in common.
     
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