I'd Do My Wife

Helen21

New Member
Russian
Hello, I found a t-shirt that well sells with this sentence "Today I Don't Feel Like Doing Anything Except My Wife I'd Do Her" What does "I do my wife" mean? Is it adult humor? I didn't understand what is funny in this phrase.
 
  • Leeeroy

    Senior Member
    Polish - Poland
    It's what I think passes as a double entendre in 2021 actually; to do someone could also mean to kill/brutalize them. The guy's tired but is out running errands (or else how could you see the shirt?) for the wife. What do you think is on his mind? The second meaning (already mentioned above) softens the message and makes it palatable (to the modern audience).

    It's not really funny; that "I'd Do Her" kills it for me; it makes the "joke" too obvious. Without that, the phrase has some potential; it could probably get a chuckle out of me on a good day. The reason for that is that seeing only I don't feel like doing anything except my wife makes one wonder: is that all there is to the phrase? Perhaps there's a continuation somewhere? And then the realization strikes you and, as a comedian would say, humor happens.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I didn't understand what is funny in this phrase.
    The humor, if there is any, is in the pun: "do" meaning both* "carry out a task" and "have sex with." Whether you think, or anyone else thinks, this is funny is a separate issue. (Personally, I've seen many funnier T-shirts.)

    ___________________________
    *It also has a lot of other meanings, including the one mentioned by Leeroy in post #5, but those are the two that this pun uses.
     

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    It's what I think passes as a double entendre in 2021 actually; to do someone could also mean to kill/brutalize them. The guy's tired but is out running errands (or else how could you see the shirt?) for the wife. What do you think is on his mind? The second meaning (already mentioned above) softens the message and makes it palatable (to the modern audience).

    That's quite the stretch I think.

    I agree with Egmont. The joke is that the person doesn't feel like doing anything but is making an exception for having sex with the wife. The joke is in the verb "do". As for funny or crude that's pretty personal.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Sex" is almost certainly correct, but "do" can carry other meanings in other situations.

    The one that comes to mind now, is a hitman, a man paid to kill other people, might "do" his next victim. The context would have to be clear, but I could conceive of a dialog that used "do" in just that manner.

    Gangster hiring a hitman: I want you to take care of Mr. Smith, and I want it taken care of today.
    Hitman: No problem. I'll do him when he leaves his office to go home.
    Gangster: Do that. And let me know when that problem has been taken care of.
     

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    In casual (I suppose "crude") conversation among "dudes" I would expect "do her" to almost exclusively mean "have sex with her", and virtually never "kill her". Just statistically speaking.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    As a UKer, I feel that 'do' here only refers to sex, like most posters - but unlike the American contingent, I can't hear 'to do someone' meaning to kill them.

    Now, 'to do someone in' would be possible in at least English English meaning to kill them (hit man or not) but not to have sex with them. Does not this expression work in the USA?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    As a UKer, I feel that 'do' here only refers to sex, like most posters - but unlike the American contingent, I can't hear 'to do someone' meaning to kill them.

    Now, 'to do someone in' would be possible in at least English English meaning to kill them (hit man or not) but not to have sex with them. Does not this expression work in the USA?
    In casual (I suppose "crude") conversation among "dudes" I would expect "do her" to almost exclusively mean "have sex with her", and virtually never "kill her". Just statistically speaking.
    I thought I was being clear that “sex” was almost certainly correct in this case, and “do” meaning “kill” required specific context.

    And 99% of the time it is sex, except that statistic changes when you hang out with contract killers.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Amusingly, “I do” is the expected response at an American wedding ceremony.

    Do you take this woman to be your lawfully wed wife?
    l do.
     
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