I'd like to welcome you to come back.

stephenlearner

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

When a visitor is ready to leave my house, I say:
I'd like to welcome you to come again;
I'd like to welcome you to come back.

Does only the first sentence sound natural?

I often hear people say "welcome back", so I don't know whether the second sentence is OK or not.


Thank you.
 
  • tehtmc

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I'd like to welcome you to come again;
    I'd like to welcome you to come back.

    They are not natural.


    When the visitor is about to leave : Do come again.
    You welcome somebody back when the person returns from somewhere, not when he/she visits you again.
     
    Neither sounds natural to me. Actually I'm not sure how to say that. Most of the time I just hear "see you soon".

    "Welcome back" is said to someone who just returned from somewhere else. For example, you can say "welcome back" to a friend who just came back from a vacation. It's not used in the scenario you described.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I also don't find the examples in the OP idiomatic.

    One could, however, use "welcome back here", when departing: You are welcome back here anytime.
     

    stez

    Senior Member
    english - australia
    I agree that they don't sound natural. Tehtmc's suggestion (Do come again) is quite correct but sounds very formal in a BE way. 'Please come again' is probably a little less formal.
     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    If I visit somebody's house and when I am ready to leave, I say: I'd like to welcome you to come to my house.
    Does it, as an invitation, sound natural?
     

    stez

    Senior Member
    english - australia
    If I visit somebody's house and when I am ready to leave, I say: I'd like to welcome you to come to my house.
    Does it, as an invitation, sound natural?
    I would say: 'I'd like to invite you to my house' or 'You are welcome to come to my house'.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I couldn't talk about welcoming someone to my house when I was still in somebody else's home. For me that would not be a natural way of inviting someone. First I invite them, then when they turn up on my doorstep I welcome them.

    If they are talking about coming to my home town I might, like stez, say: "You are welcome to come and visit me in Athens any time - just give me a call first."
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Thank you, perpend.
    If this is normal, why is I'd like to welcome you to come again in the original post not normal?
    Is it a cultural issue?
    You are cherry-picking in your posts. I would suggest you reread.

    "I'd like to welcome you to come again" remains unidiomatic for me.
     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In the OP, I'd like to welcome you to come again, does not work.
    In the later post, I'd like to welcome you to come to my house, works.

    I can't see the reason why the first is wrong and the second is right.
     
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