I'd like to write you / to you a bit about...

sunnyweather

Senior Member
Polish
I wonder if it sounds natural if I write in an informal letter:

I'd like to write you / write to you a bit about it.

Or maybe 'write' should be replaced with 'tell' in the first option?

Thank you for your help in advance.
 
  • Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    In a sentence where "write" doesn't have a direct object, "write you" is American English. In British English it's "write to you":
    - I'd like to write to you about it (BrE) (and sometimes AmE, I think).
    - I'd like to write you about it (AmE only).

    However, when "write" has a direct object (for example, 'a poem'), the most usual form, in any variant of English, is:
    - I'd like to write you a poem about it. (Here, "write you a poem" means "write a poem for you".)

    I'm not sure what you mean by "a bit", sunny, (briefly?, a short piece of text?, ...) — but "I'd like to write (to) you a bit about it" isn't something I'd expect a native speaker to say.

    Ws
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I wonder if it sounds natural if I write in an informal letter:
    I'd like to write you / write to you a bit about it.
    Or maybe 'write' should be replaced with 'tell' in the first option?
    In answer to your question: I think so. The recipient will be reading your letter, and it's obvious that you've written. So yes, this would be perfect:
    I'd like to tell you a bit about it. :thumbsup:
     
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