I'd sooner

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
Could I say "I'd sooner you asked then" ?
"I don't mind you borrowing my things. But I'd sooner you asked then."
Thanks.
 
  • mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Hi, cropje_njr and Blues Piano Man.
    Could you tell me if "woud rather" and "would sooner" are the same?
    I used "then" to say that you should have asked for permission when you took my things.
    To express this idea, could I say:
    I don't mind you borrowing my things. But I'd sooner/rather you had asked then.
     

    cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Saying "then" doesn't sound right, and isn't really necessary to construct the meaning of the sentence, mainly because the person spoken to will no doubt be aware of when they should have asked.

    Could you tell me if "would rather" and "would sooner" are the same?

    More or less, yes.
     

    cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    The "then" sounds strange to my ears, and I didn't understand what you meant by it until you explained, above.

    If you want to emphasise a point in the past where he/she should have asked permission, the usual phrase (conversationally) would be:

    But I'd rather/sooner you had asked back there/just then.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi,
    Could I say "I'd sooner you asked then" ?
    "I don't mind you borrowing my things. But I'd sooner you asked then."
    Thanks.

    I think that the word you want is "than", Mimi.

    "I'd sooner you asked than just take my books"
    "I'd sooner you asked than just assume that you could use my notes"
    "I'd sooner you asked than borrow my jewellry"
     

    Blues Piano Man

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi, cropje_njr and Blues Piano Man.
    Could you tell me if "woud rather" and "would sooner" are the same?
    I used "then" to say that you should have asked for permission when you took my things.
    To express this idea, could I say:
    I don't mind you borrowing my things. But I'd sooner/rather you had asked then.

    The common phrase I quoted in my first post, I'd sooner you asked first, means not only that you are unhappy with their action. It also is requesting them to ask first next time.

    I don't know if using "...had asked" means exactly the same or not.

    Hope that helps,
    Blues :)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I suspect that some objections to the 'then' come from people initially reading it in a rhetorical way, in which it scarcely works.

    In BE we could easily say: 'I'd sooner you had asked then", meaning "I'd have preferred you to ask then rather than now".

    You could also say, it seems to me: "I'd sooner you asked then" (Mimi's original sentence), meaning "When you ask I'd prefer you to ask then, rather than later or earlier". In other words you are giving general directions ex ante about when you like being asked.

    Of course if you imagine the sentence spoken, or written, ex post, you run into the tense difficulty I tried to resolve in my sentence in green.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    For some reason I can't imagine saying "I'd sooner you asked" to mean I would have been happier if you had asked - in the past. I think it's because there is no point now in expressing a preference to someone about events that have already happened.

    In my head, I'd sooner you asked ... is, as Blues said, a comment on the fact that you didn't ask that time and a request that you ask in future.
     

    rosicler

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hello:
    I have to translate this quote by Father Andrew, but I think that a word may be missing. I tried to find this quote in the Internet but I could not find it. Perhaps, some of you (English native) can explain it to me, or tell me if is there a missing word. Thank you, in advance.

    I feel that God would sooner we did wrong in loving than never love for fear we should do wrong.
    Father Andrew
     

    trance0

    Senior Member
    Slovene
    I feel that God would rather see us do wrong in loving than never love because/out of fear from doing wrong.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It is difficult to reply, Rosi, without knowing which bit of the sentence is causing you difficulty. Are you familiar with the structure I would rather/sooner you gave me a kiss than gave me a punch on the nose? It expresses a preference between two hypotheticals.
     

    rosicler

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    It is difficult to reply, Rosi, without knowing which bit of the sentence is causing you difficulty. Are you familiar with the structure I would rather/sooner you gave me a kiss than gave me a punch on the nose? It expresses a preference between two hypotheticals.

    Thank you teddy, your expanation helped me a lot!!!. I was not familiar with that structure. Thank you again for your English lesson!!!
     

    Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    While going through this thread, this question came to my mind.

    Consider this sentence:
    I'd walk out than to sit watch this boring movie.
    I'd sooner walk out than to sit watch this boring movie.

    This sentence means: I would prefer to go out than to sit and watch this boring movie.


    But if I want to say this: I would have preferred to go out than to sit and watch this boring movie.

    I want you please suggest a way to convey the same meaning using "I'd rather" and "I'd sooner".
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'd sooner/rather have gone out than sat and watched that boring movie. (Everything is in the past, so your verbs have to reflect that.)
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Usual version
    I would have sooner gone out than have sat and watched that boring movie.

    Often shortened to:
    I would have sooner gone out than sat and watched that boring movie.

    The same applies in this case:
    I would rather have gone out than [have] sat and watched that boring movie.

    * Theoretically have watched, but that seems to be labouring the point.
     

    ELPYLULU

    Member
    ITALIAN
    Hi natives,

    I have found this phrase: I'd sooner give up smooking than try any of those magic slimming products.

    Now the expression I'd sooner..than is the same as to say I'd rather... than, I mean to prefer to do somenthing instead of something else???

    Thank you for your precious help.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, it means you prefer to do <A> over <B>.

    I love smooking by the way -- the word, not the habit. :) Seriously, I've never seen it before (amazingly) and it's pretty cute.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    (I've never seen it either, but I'm not amazed - it's not in any of the several dictionaries I checked. It's just misspelt "smoking", isn't it? :) )
     

    colia

    Senior Member
    francais
    Hi,

    could you please help me: in the sentence: 'I'd sooner die', does 'd stand for had or for would? is it equivalent in meaning to I'd rather?
     

    colia

    Senior Member
    francais
    Thanks for your help Renaissance man! I thought 'I'd rather' was for 'I would rather'...am I wrong?
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Thanks for your help Renaissance man! I thought 'I'd rather' was for 'I would rather'...am I wrong?
    You can't tell without further context. In "I'd rather taken a liking to him" it means "had", but this "rather" means something more like "quite" rather than "sooner".
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Ah, I see now, I've never heard it before. Would you say it is informal language ?
    No, I don't think so. For me "I'm rather hungry" is just a bit less strong than "I'm very hungry". In fact, rather* than formal or informal I'd say it's flavour is a little old-fashioned, but just a little bit.


    *haha, I only noticed I wrote that after I'd written it!
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Moderator note: I have merged this thread with some earlier ones on the same construction. You might want to have a look at the earlier posts.
     
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