Identifying subject, predicate, object in the following sentence

CatBarrow

Member
German
Hi!
This is a sentence from Dickens' A Christmas Carol. I tried to identify its constituents but I have some troubles with the second part (in bold). (Maybe because I don't fully grasp its meaning. Why is 'Change capitalised?) I hope you can help me figure it out. Thank you!




1. And (Cj) Scrooge’s name (s) was (v) good (c) to ‘Change (v) for anything (o) he (s) chose (v) to put his hand to.(o)


Cj= Conjunction, S= subject, V= verb, C= copula verb, O = object
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I'm not sure, but you might want to look up 'Change. Note the apostrophe and the capital! I think it's short for The Exchange, i.e. the Stock Exchange.

    And Scrooge's hand is his signature.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, in the nineteenth century people were said to lose their fortune on 'Change, i.e. through Stock Exchange transactions. I haven't seen it much outside that expression, but here 'good to' seems to mean 'good as regarded by': the members or traders of the Stock Exchange trusted his signature.
     

    CatBarrow

    Member
    German
    Thank you! I got the meaning of the sentence. But what is about the attribution of subject, verb etc. Are they okay this way or can I see the last part "for anything (o) he (s) chose (v) to put his hand to.(o)" as an adverbial?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Well, the phrase beginning with 'for' (and going to the end of the sentence) is an idiomatic complement of 'good': someone is 'good for a loan', for example, if you know they will always give you a loan; if Scrooge is good for an amount of money, they can rely on him coming up with the money. You could call that an adverbial, if that fits your idea of an adverbial. (It's not a term I use myself.)
     
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