idiom for too curious people

lobelia.ophrys

Senior Member
French
Hello everybody,

I wondered if you have an idiom in English to say to too curious people?

For exemple, someone looks at the big bag you're carying and asks "What's in your bag?" and, a big irritated (because it's not her/his business), you reply something a bit mean but funny in the same time (not the common "it's none if your business" because it's too common and not enough in the "mood" of what I'm looking for).

In French, you could say things like (litterary translated) "It's curious seed" or "it's something to make corpses talk" etc... but in English I have nooo idea except the "it's none of your business", "mind your own business" etc...

Thank you in advance!
 
  • baldpate

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    The reply "That would be telling!" comes to mind, as a way of turning the enquiry aside in a light-hearted way.
     

    lobelia.ophrys

    Senior Member
    French
    The reply "That would be telling!" comes to mind, as a way of turning the enquiry aside in a light-hearted way.

    Thank you very much. But it sounds too "kind" and not really what I'm looking for...

    I think "curiosity killed the cat" like Trochfa mentionned fits the context better.

    Thanks to you both
     

    lobelia.ophrys

    Senior Member
    French
    What is "the mood"? You could say anything -> "My ostrich polisher." or "Invitations to the funeral of the last person who asked that question."

    I much prefer that!

    The "mood" is a bit of fun mingled with something a bit mean said from someone very irritated by curious people :p
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Something with 'nosey' in, or 'nosey parker'.

    You're a right little nosey parker, aren't you?
    You'd better watch out or you'll get that nose of yours snipped off.
     

    lobelia.ophrys

    Senior Member
    French
    "If I told you I would have to kill you".

    See here.

    I knew this one but it sounds too sweet or too ironic! :D

    Something with 'nosey' in, or 'nosey parker'.

    You're a right little nosey parker, aren't you?
    You'd better watch out or you'll get that nose of yours snipped off.

    Thank you very much. This one sounds good too (even though a bit too nice :p).

    I'm annoying I know... hehe
     

    lobelia.ophrys

    Senior Member
    French
    Well, then it's not at all what I thought!!! hahaha

    I found nosey but nothing about "nosey parker" but since it's not nice at all, then that's great! :p

    Thank you very much! :D
     

    tittiugo

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    Something with 'nosey' in, or 'nosey parker'.

    You're a right little nosey parker, aren't you?
    You'd better watch out or you'll get that nose of yours snipped off.

    Sorry Hermione,

    the meaning of "PARKER" escapes me! :p

    Are you able to explain it to me?

    PS...Although I looked up for it on WRDictionary I did not come to a solution...
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It appears to be someone's surname (the phrase is commonly written Nosy Parker, or even Mr Nosy Parker), but there's no known explanation if there was a real Mr Parker who was first called that.

    There's a good American equivalent 'nosenheimer', and an even better Australian one, 'stickybeak'.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    For exemple, someone looks at the big bag you're carying and asks "What's in your bag?" and, a big irritated (because it's not her/his business), you reply something a bit mean but funny in the same time (not the common "it's none if your business" because it's too common and not enough in the "mood" of what I'm looking for).
    It's a voodoo doll! I managed to find one that looks remarkably like you and can't wait to get home and stick some pins into it!
     

    tittiugo

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    It appears to be someone's surname (the phrase is commonly written Nosy Parker, or even Mr Nosy Parker), but there's no known explanation if there was a real Mr Parker who was first called that.

    There's a good American equivalent 'nosenheimer', and an even better Australian one, 'stickybeak'.

    Thanks Entangledbank...:)
     
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