idiomatic way of saying I just arrived at the destination

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shorty1

Senior Member
Korean
Dear all,


Let's say I'm making a self-trip video and I want to tell viewers I've just arrived at the destination.
How can I say that?
#1. Here we are.
#2. We are here.
#3. There I am.
#4. I am there.
#5. Here I am.
#6. I am here.

All of them makes sense in this context?


Thank you for your help.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    You haven't really given us enough of the context to be able to answer your question, shorty1. Are you traveling alone, or with others? Are you narrating the video as you go, or adding the narration to it later? What are you doing in the video when you say this phrase, and what is the purpose of the narration? Are you trying to say "This is video of us arriving at Place X?" or "You can see us in the back of the crowd here?"

    And, finally, which versions do you think are correct for your scenario?
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    You haven't really given us enough of the context to be able to answer your question, shorty1. Are you traveling alone, or with others? Are you narrating the video as you go, or adding the narration to it later? What are you doing in the video when you say this phrase, and what is the purpose of the narration? Are you trying to say "This is video of us arriving at Place X?" or "You can see us in the back of the crowd here?"

    And, finally, which versions do you think are correct for your scenario?

    Thank you, Florentia.

    I'll suppose I'm traveling alone and narrating the video as I go.
    I've just arrived at the destination.
    I think "here we are." is correct.
    To begin with, I'd like to know if "we are here." is correct, too.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    If you're traveling alone, I'm not sure who "we" would be.

    I"d be more likely to say "Here I am in Tokyo..." or "I'm here at the top of the Eiffel Tower…"
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    If you're traveling alone, I'm not sure who "we" would be.

    I"d be more likely to say "Here I am in Tokyo..." or "I'm here at the top of the Eiffel Tower…"

    Florentia, If possible viewers on the internet already know where the destination is, can I just say "here I am." or "I am here."?
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Shorty, the title you gave this thread is "idiomatic way of saying I just arrived at the destination". So firstly, "I've just arrived at the destination" is perfectly idiomatic. You say that the destination is known (let's assume it's Paris), so that would be "I've just arrived in Paris".

    None of your other sentences expresses the idea of "just arrived", and none of them sounds very natural in your context. "Here I am", on its own, sounds like something you'd say if you knew people had been looking for you ("Where's Shorty? ... "Here I am!"). "Here I am in Paris" would work, but it says only that you're there: you may have been there for a month.

    If you want to say that you've just arrived in Paris, I can't think of a better way than
    "I've just arrived in Paris".

    Ws
    :)
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    If viewers already know where you are, why do you need to say "Here I am!".


    Far better to assume that SOME viewers SOMEWHERE and after SOME LONG TIME, might not remember/recognise where you are.


    It therefore makes complete sense to say WHERE you are as in "Here I am at the top of the Eiffel Tower, looking out over the beautiful boulevards of the French capital, Paris, at sunset on a warm spring day in April, 2015."

    And when you have decided whether "I have just arrived" is important or not, you might need to include that too.


    If you do decide to mention that you have just arrived, you still need to make clear whether you have just arrived in (eg) France, or just arrived in Paris from another French city/town, or just arrived at the Eiffel Tower, or just arrived at the top of the Eiffel Tower, ie you may have been in Paris for weeks, queuing for days, and only just arrived in the elevator at the top of the tower.

    To have utility, your sentence needs to be reasonably specific.
     
    Last edited:

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you very much, all. :)

    Could you confirm one more thing?

    Imagine that my son and I are going to the zoo.
    My son says, "Are we there yet? let me know when we arrive there."
    And finally when we've just arrived there, can I say to him, "here we are."?

    And is "we are here." interchangeable with "here we are."?
    I was wondering if it would be ok even if the word order changed.
     
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