If a Client <will> receive services from a Freelancer it has classified as an employee, then...

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JJXR

Senior Member
Russian
Hello to all,

Thanks for reading my post.


Source:

User Agreement - Legal Pages

Sample sentence:

If a Client will receive services from a Freelancer it has classified as an employee, then the Client agrees that the Upwork Payroll Agreement applies, and Client agrees to enroll in Upwork Payroll for each such relationship.

Question:

Is the use of will correct in the above sentence? Is the sentence correct without it?


Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions!

Regards,
JJXR
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It is not clear to me whether it means is willing to or wishes to receive (or even is going to receive or will be receiving).

    I would therefore prefer to make clear what is meant.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Which paragraph does this sentence appear in, JJXR? Personally, I'd write If a Client receives..., or perhaps If a Client is to receive... On the other hand, lawyers have their own style of writing which can be baffling to the rest of us.
    You can sometimes have the future after if, although it's not normal.
    Wait here if you will. Shows politeness. There's an idea of being willing to do something rather than of the future.
    If you will play your drums all night, it's not surprising you're unpopular with your neighbours. Shows insistence. If you insist on playing... Note that the will is stressed and is not abbreviated to 'll.
    If it'll get us there quicker, we can go by train. You're thinking of the result or purpose of going by train and not just of the condition.
    Cross-posted.
     
    Last edited:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    If a Client receives services from a Freelancer it has classified as an employee, then the Client agrees that the Upwork Payroll Agreement applies, and Client agrees to enroll in Upwork Payroll for each such relationship.

    Although if "will" means "plans to," then I suppose it's all right.

    Cross-posted.
     

    JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thank you all for your valuable comments. I greatly appreciate your help.
     
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