If it rains this afternoon, your garden party is doomed.

Nawee

Senior Member
Thai
Hello,

In the following sentence, the second part is in the future or in the present? If I understand it correctly, the event in the condition (rain) has not happened yet. How come the second part is in the present tense?

"If it rains this afternoon, your garden party is doomed."

Thank you.

Nawee
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I've composed a couple times (and) started over---I can't put my finger on it, but here's my idea now.

    The first part of the sentence is a sort of hypothetical "If it rains ..." (in the event that it should rain).

    The party is doomed only when the rain occurs (when it happens), so we used "is", the present.

    In the moment that it rains, the party is then doomed.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    We often use the present tense in speaking of the future; there have been quite a few threads discussing this.

    It wouldn't be wrong to say "will be doomed" in that sentence, but it wouldn't be idiomatic.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top