If + Participle

Russian
I want to ask you about correctness of sentences having an If clause with a participle. Are the sentences considered correct?
1)If intending to do the laundry take my dingy socks.
2)If not disappointed at the beginning of a day, she won't grumble.
3)They will be there in a minute, if not having met any trouble on the road.
I find using the participles in this form very convenient, hope this is correct.
 
  • Those are all incorrect.

    The first and third sentences are unnatural, but what about the second one? I have found some examples of using Past Participle with If. Maybe they have some other pattern?
    1-If used
    this method will help us to increase the output.
    2-If given their freedom, they will be more hardworking.
    3 -If (being) properly carried out, microwave determination of dipole moment should be of considerable reliability
     
    The first and third sentences are unnatural, but what about the second one? I have found some examples of using Past Participle with If. Maybe they have some other pattern?
    1-If used
    this method will help us to increase the output.
    2-If given their freedom, they will be more hardworking.
    3 -If (being) properly carried out, microwave determination of dipole moment should be of considerable reliability
    The first two above are fine; the third is fine if you delete "being." In all three "If" should be directly followed by the past participle.

    (There should be a comma in 1. after "If used," but that's a minor point.)
     
    It would be better to change 'a day' to 'the day', whatever it's supposed to be about.
    I might even use the 'if + past participle' in speech, which is most unlikely for the present participle.
    If not disappointed at the beginning of the day, she won't grumble.
    I think this sounds natural enough.
     
    If a day is changed to the day, will the second sentence be correct?
    I don't think it matters much. Ignoring the issue of what the sentence is trying to say, which is unclear, we really need the grammatical subject and corresponding verb to follow "If-": "If she isn't disappointed..." In theory you can say something like this:

    If not tired at the beginning of the marathon, she will certainly be tired after it ends
    .

    English allows that kind of construction, but we rarely use it.
     
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