If raining tomorrow, we'll cancel the picnic?

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Hit Girl

Senior Member
Korean
Hello,

Is this sentence correct?


"It raining tomorrow, we'll cancel the picnic."

According to the person who wrote it, 'it raining tomorrow' does the same thing as 'if it rains tomorrow'.
Is that so? It doesn't sound right to me so I thought I'd run it by the forum.

Thanks!
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It sounds wrong to me because raining and cancel do not have the same subject. Nevertheless, you might hear people say it: many native speakers are unfussy about this kind of agreement.
     

    Hit Girl

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It sounds wrong to me because raining and cancel do not have the same subject. Nevertheless, you might hear people say it: many native speakers are unfussy about this kind of agreement.
    Yes, the person says that's why he added 'it' in front of 'raining tomorrow'. It still sounds weird, doesn't it?
    If I really have to make something out of 'it raining', can I say 'It raining so much, I stayed home yesterday'? (past instead of future)
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    I'm afraid I think Florentia's answer would be correct only if there were no "it" at the beginning of that sentence and the sentence started with "raining."
    In my opinion, the sentence in the OP is grammatically wrong, whatever the intended meaning.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Is this sentence correct?
    We are offered two different sentences: (1) 'If raining tomorrow, we'll cancel the picnic' (thread title); (2) 'It raining tomorrow, we'll cancel the picnic' (post 1).

    Both are incorrect. What is needed is a future open conditional: 'If it rains tomorrow, we will cancel the picnic'.

    Please note that in English, a clause (such as the first part of this sentence) requires a finite verb: that means a verb specified by person (first, second or third person), by number (singular or plural) and by tense (past, present, future etc.). In other words, a form such as 'raining' on its own is not enough.
     

    Hit Girl

    Senior Member
    Korean
    We are offered two different sentences: (1) 'If raining tomorrow, we'll cancel the picnic' (thread title); (2) 'It raining tomorrow, we'll cancel the picnic' (post 1).

    Both are incorrect. What is needed is a future open conditional: 'If it rains tomorrow, we will cancel the picnic'.

    Please note that in English, a clause (such as the first part of this sentence) requires a finite verb: that means a verb specified by person (first, second or third person), by number (singular or plural) and by tense (past, present, future etc.). In other words, a form such as 'raining' on its own is not enough.
    Oh thanks! I meant to type 'It raining tomorrow' on the title as well. Thank you for the explanation.
     

    Hit Girl

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I'm afraid I think Florentia's answer would be correct only if there were no "it" at the beginning of that sentence and the sentence started with "raining."
    In my opinion, the sentence in the OP is grammatically wrong, whatever the intended meaning.
    Thank you. I thought so.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    According to the person who wrote it, 'it raining tomorrow' does the same thing as 'if it rains tomorrow'.
    Are you sure he didn't mean "If raining tomorrow..."? It's still incorrect but much closer to correct than "It raining tomorrow..."
     

    Hit Girl

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Are you sure he didn't mean "If raining tomorrow..."? It's still incorrect but much closer to correct than "It raining tomorrow..."
    Yes, I'm sure he definitely meant 'IT raining tomorrow' because he was talking about dangling participle? So this is how he went about explaining the concept -
    He said 'Raining tomorrow, we'll cancel the picnic' is an example of dangling participle. In order to correct it, he said we need to add 'IT' in front of 'raining', thus 'It raining tomorrow, we'll...'.
    I feel that's not a good example and it doesn't even sound right or natural before or after the correction...
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I'm afraid I think Florentia's answer would be correct only if there were no "it" at the beginning of that sentence and the sentence started with "raining."
    In my opinion, the sentence in the OP is grammatically wrong, whatever the intended meaning.
    I agree. I was reading both versions as "If raining..."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I feel that's not a good example and it doesn't even sound right or natural before or after the correction...
    I agree with you about all of it.

    You need not just "if" or "it", you need both... and an "is".

    "If it's raining tomorrow, we'll cancel the picnic."
     
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