if the planet was not heating up

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Do you native English speakers naturally think that "if the planet was not heating up" refers to "if the planet was not heating up anthropogenically"? Or is the expression "heating up" simply neutral in its grammar or rhetoric, referring to neither nature-caused or human-caused?

The article is particularly talking about anthropogenic factors in climate change. The expression "if the planet was not heating up" is ambiguous to me in that the cause of heating up is unclear.

Thanks in advance

**********************
This week the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society published an assessment of the connection between climate change and extreme events in 2016, the society’s sixth annual report on the topic. The report selects a handful of extreme events from the previous year and disentangles anthropogenic climate change’s effects from natural variability (meaning what we would expect to happen without human influence). For the first time in the report’s history, scientists said that they have found that several of the events could not have occurred if the planet was not heating up.


-Scientific American

Source
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The sentence does not imply that the heating is "anthropogenic", and this issue is irrelevant to the extract you have quoted. The "extreme events" are due to the heating, and not necessarily to the human involvement.
     

    grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Do you native English speakers naturally think that "if the planet was not heating up" refers to "if the planet was not heating up anthropogenically"? Or is the expression "heating up" simply neutral in its grammar or rhetoric, referring to neither nature-caused or human-caused?
    No, the phrasing itself doesn't say anything whatsoever about the anthropogenic origins of it.
    You have to actually know something about the topic to know that it's anthropogenic. :)

    cross-posted
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    The sentence does not imply that the heating is "anthropogenic", and this issue is irrelevant to the extract you have quoted. The "extreme events" are due to the heating, and not necessarily to the human involvement.
    The title of the article is:Major Report: Some Extreme Weather Can Only Be Blamed on Humans
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    No, the phrasing itself doesn't say anything whatsoever about the anthropogenic origins of it.
    You have to actually know something about the topic to know that it's anthropogenic. :)

    cross-posted
    Thank you but your native language is Polish though you've a good command of English.:)
     
    Last edited:

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thank you but your native language is Polish though you've a good command of English.:)
    Not a wise comment - it sounds condescending:( Many people grew up as young children in a country they declare (rightfully) as their native language but spend the rest of their lives in an Engish-speaking country and have a command as good as and often better than those who only speak English and know nothing of other languages.

    As noted, the sentence itself does not have the meaning (grammar itself is always neutral) of anthropogenically - it is the context (the other text it is with!) that provides the “anthropogenic” meaning.

    For example : “I’m going to London.” On its own it is a simple statement. In a bigger piece of text it could be a strong statement of defiance: I’m going to London and there’s nothing you can do to stop me.”

    I’m sure you remember this “English words and phrases can have many different meanings. Understanding them depends on where, when and how they are used.” from the first sticky in the forum:) Please READ this before you post: English Only Guidelines — forum rules.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Not a wise comment - it sounds condescending:( Many people grew up as young children in a country they declare (rightfully) as their native language but spend the rest of their lives in an Engish-speaking country and have a command as good as and often better than those who only speak English and know nothing of other languages.
    I am greatly sorry if my expression has such grave side effect. I didn't mean to - my English needs to be improved.

    Sincere apology to Grassy who is always helpful if I've offended you.


    I'll read rest of your reply tomorrow, Julian. Here's small hours.:)
     
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