If the rent hadn't been reasonable, he wouldn't have lived here for such a long time

TGW

Senior Member
Chinese
How do we discribe a situation that didn't happen and imagine the result of this situation, which began in the past and continued to the present time. It's like the combination of 'third condition' and 'present perfect tense'.

The rent I (landlord) have been charging has been reasonable (for ten years).
He (tenant) has been lived in this apartment (for ten years) and is still living here.

I'd say: If the rent hadn't been reasonable, he wouldn't have lived here for such a long time.
But it seems that the sentence above is talking about the past instead of present perfect. How would you say it to make it 'present perfect + third condition'? Thanks
 
  • tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    That sentence can refer to either a past situation or an ongoing one extending to the present. If you wish to make it unambiguously clear, you'll need to say something like: If the rent hadn't been reasonable, he wouldn't still be living here after such a long time.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It is a third conditional as it stands (if+past perfect, would+perfect infinitive):

    If the rent had not been reasonable, he would not have lived here for such a long time.
    If the rent had been unreasonable, he would have moved out long ago.
    There’s no reason to change the tenses. You could use the present perfect, but not, I think, as a conditional:

    He has lived here/been living here for such a long time precisely because the rent is so reasonable.
     

    TGW

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Many thanks. If I want the last part of sentence start with 'it', can I say that this way?
    If the rent hadn't been reasonable, it wouldn't have been ten years that he has been lived here.

    That way, It seems I combine third condition and the present perfect unambiguously. Right?
     
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