If there was a second season of that serie [series] (conditional)

trimostar1

Member
Turkish
I learned from the book that the 2nd condicional with 'si' can refer to the present or future whereas the 3rd conicional with 'si' refers to the past.

but when i try to make a sentence such as:

If there was a second season of that serie when i finished the first season, i would have continued the serie.

and a friend says this is it:

si estuviera la segunda temporada la hubiera visto toda.

so my question is the 2nd condicinal with subjuntivo imperfecto can refer to past situatuons?
 
  • S.V.

    Senior Member
    Español, México
    For example, with ctrl + F to search inherente here, those lines refer to the same issue. When you say ¡está!, there is no "dot" to represent an "end". ¡Está! is more an on/off switch, which ignores yesterday & tomorrow.

    The black line doesn't need to be 'endless'. All that matters is that a big screen can keep playing in front of us, as if it represented an 'endless' .GIF inside the mind ('sube'). If a hundred shows on your mind, ON turns the thumbnail for show 101. And you may remember tomorrow or two weeks from now "Ah, there's that new season..." (its existence becomes an on/off toggle)

    In your sentence estar also represents an on/off switch, which ignores when it was added (a 'dot' at the start). So yes, ver toda is then placed in a hypothetical past, 'included' in that black line.
     
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    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    so my question is the 2nd condicinal with subjuntivo imperfecto can refer to past situatuons?
    elprofe said: "Las condicionales en inglés siguen la misma estructura que en castellano." En el inglés, el "Second conditional" indica un resultado posible. (If I knew what you wanted, maybe I could help you. I would do a computer course if I had the time.)
    If there was a second season of that serie when i finished the first season, i would have continued the serie.
    Si hubiera una segunda temporada de esa serie cuando terminé la primera temporada, (yo) habría continuado la serie. (Google translator)
     
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    Sendro Páez

    Senior Member
    Spanish - España
    If there was a second season of that series when I finished the first season, I would have continued the series.
    I thought this was not proper English.* As I'm confused, I can't but guess about its meaning. Based on that guess, I'll suggest the following alternatives in Spanish:

    Si {hubiera habido una ~ hubiera estado la} segunda temporada de esa serie cuando terminé la primera, habría continuado la serie.​

    Once we have the condicional perfecto ("habría continuado") in the main clause, the pretérito pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo ("hubiera habido," "hubiera estado") is the tense of choice — the pretérito imperfecto de subjuntivo ("estuviera," "hubiera") makes no sense.


    * Shouldn't this be If there had been a 2nd season?
     

    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    Estrictamente hablando, el subjuntivo inglés es "if there were ..."
    :tick:
    "After if, the subjunctive forms were and be are sometimes used in second conditional sentences in very formal contexts.
    If there were any reason to doubt his word, we would ask him to resign."
    (The Cambridge Grammar of English, 458)
     

    S.V.

    Senior Member
    Español, México
    For example.

    "If I were Italian, I am sure I would have been with you entirely from the beginning of your victorious struggle" (Churchill).

    Of course, the basic rules are still useful. But were & fuera/estuviera are not seen as 'dots' located in the past, in these cases. Rather, an imaginary toggle which can even 'change' the entirety of one's life (its past included, in the black line).
     
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    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I learned from the book that the 2nd condicional with 'si' can refer to the present or future whereas the 3rd conicional with 'si' refers to the past.

    but when i try to make a sentence such as:

    If there was a second season of that serie when i finished the first season, i would have continued the serie.

    and a friend says this is it:

    si estuviera la segunda temporada la hubiera visto toda.

    so my question is the 2nd condicinal with subjuntivo imperfecto can refer to past situatuons?

    Conditional patterns, in English and Spanish, are simply guidelines/patterns (not "rules") of what you can say, not what you "must" say. In getting from the "condition" to the "result," any number of verb combinations is possible, based on speaker intent and perspective. Language is flexible, not a straight-jacket.

    So, you can say

    If there was, If there were, or If there had been

    hubiera visto
    or habría visto

    And we, Spanish speakers, can rightfully use the label "subjuntive," because our subjuntive is inflected/morphologically marked. Through morphemes, Spanish verbs scream "Hey! Look at me, I'm subjuntive!" In Old English, the subjunctive was indeed inflected, and thus a property of the verb. But English got rid of those subjunctive inflections long ago. The only thing that could possibly be called "subjunctive" in English is the "were" form that shows up in counterfactual contexts (i.e. If I were), but since this only applies to "be" and no other verb, this hardly means that modern English has a subjunctive mood.
     

    Marsianitoh

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    In my opinion, "If there was a second season of that series when I finished the first one, I would have continued watching it" is wrong. You should have said:
    " if there had been a second season when I finished the first..."
    If there's no second season and you don't want to link that fact to the moment in which you watched the first one you could say :
    " If there were a second season of that series, I would have continued watching it when I finished the first".
    In Spanish:
    - Si hubiera habido una segunda temporada cuando termine la primera, habría continuado viéndola.
    - Si hubiera una segunda temporada de esa serie, hubiera continuado viéndola cuando terminé la primera.
    But not:
    - Si hubiera una segunda temporada de esa serie cuando terminé la primera, habría continuado viéndola.
     

    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    SevenDays said:
    <<Conditional patterns, in English and Spanish, are simply guidelines/patterns (not "rules") of what you can say, not what you "must" say. In getting from the "condition" to the "result," any number of verb combinations is possible, based on speaker intent and perspective. Language is flexible, not a straight-jacket.>>
    :tick:
    (If any users here are interested in seeing examples with "there had been," I'm giving the following ones followed by clauses in different tenses.) It would be appreciated if users can offer the sources for their grammatical points.
    if there had been
    was, would, etc.
    "Trial testimony showed that even if there had been something on Mr. Haceesa's mind that morning after the game,it was like him not to mention it.” (The New York Times)
    “Sadly, if there had been something like this around at the time,my father would probably still be here today." (Vice)
    “. . . if there had been something happening in the communitythey weren't there to deal with that because they were in the prison.”
    (The Guardian)
     
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    Federicarol

    New Member
    Italian
    I thought this was not proper English.* As I'm confused, I can't but guess about its meaning. Based on that guess, I'll suggest the following alternatives in Spanish:

    Si {hubiera habido una ~ hubiera estado la} segunda temporada de esa serie cuando terminé la primera, habría continuado la serie.​

    Once we have the condicional perfecto ("habría continuado") in the main clause, the pretérito pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo ("hubiera habido," "hubiera estado") is the tense of choice — the pretérito imperfecto de subjuntivo ("estuviera," "hubiera") makes no sense.


    * Shouldn't this be If there had been a 2nd season?
    Good afternoon Sandro,

    both structures are correct, just in the example, the speaker is using the so-called "mixed conditional", which combines two different types of conditional patterns. You can find a thorough explanation here:

    BBC World Service | Learning English | Learn it
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    In my opinion, "If there was a second season of that series when I finished the first one, I would have continued watching it" is wrong. You should have said:
    " if there had been a second season when I finished the first..."
    I agree.
    If there's no second season and you don't want to link that fact to the moment in which you watched the first one you could say :
    " If there were a second season of that series, I would have continued watching it when I finished the first".
    I also agree with this. In fact, it is probably the more likely choice of a NES here.

    While "was" is extremely common in such contexts, it is incorrect. There is no need for English learners to copy the bad habits of native speakers.
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    My take:
    If there were = statement contrary to fact in the present. If there were a second season (it doesn’t actually exist today), I would watch it (today).

    If there had been = statement contrary to fact about the past. If there had been a second season available when I finished watching the first season (there wasn’t), I would have watched it (back then).
     

    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    Re "if there was" and "if there were," the first sentence below expresses possibility, and the second expresses doubt (bordering on denial?):

    (1) "If there was no big bang, how and where do we start the story of the universe?" or

    (2) "But if there were no Big Bang, then the predominance of matter over antimatter can be explained by the natural course of evolution of matter in space."
     

    DAlvarez

    Senior Member
    English and Spanish
    The grammatically correct sentence in English to refer to a past situation is as follows:

    If there had been a second season of that series when I finished (watching) the first one, I would have continued watching it.

    The use of If there was|were is incorrect in this particular sentence.

    In Spanish:

    Si hubiera estado disponible la segunda temporada OR hubiera habido una segunda temporada cuando terminé (de ver) la primera, hubiera OR hubiese OR habría + continuado viéndola.
     
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