If there was

angel_on_fire

Member
English
You could say I am wondering if there are any vacancies for a job but if this is to be said/written to a possible employer it may be better to phrase it more formally

Is this for a letter to go with your cv? if so you could say

"I would like to enquire if you have any job vacancies currently"

or

"I would like to enquire if you currently have any job vacancies"


Regarding have a look or take a look if this is also to go in a letter with your CV you probably dont have to say this as in sending your cv to someone they will know that you wish them to take a look at it - however you could say:

"I enclose my CV for your attention"

or

"Please find enclosed a copy of my CV"


hope I have understood your question correctly!

Angel_on_Fire
 
  • *Cowgirl*

    Senior Member
    USA English
    angel_on_fire said:
    You could say I am wondering if there are any vacancies for a job but if this is to be said/written to a possible employer it may be better to phrase it more formally

    Is this for a letter to go with your cv? if so you could say

    "I would like to enquire if you have any job vacancies currently"

    or

    "I would like to enquire if you currently have any job vacancies"


    Regarding have a look or take a look if this is also to go in a letter with your CV you probably dont have to say this as in sending your cv to someone they will know that you wish them to take a look at it - however you could say:

    "I enclose my CV for your attention"

    or

    "Please find enclosed a copy of my CV"


    hope I have understood your question correctly!

    Angel_on_Fire

    enquire should be inquire but otherwise it sounds OK
     

    angel_on_fire

    Member
    English
    Inquire for American English perhaps but definitely enquire for British English when referring to a request for information

    we only use inquire when conducting an investigation - e.g. "the police were making inquiries"
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    irisheyes0583 said:
    Oh, the differences between BE and AE are just loads of fun! :D Another, just to add to the list, in AE we almost never refer it as a CV, but rather as a resume.

    And note that "enquiry" is pronounced enquiry whereas "inquiry" is inquiry.

    But think how boring life would be round here without BE AE differences...:rolleyes:
     

    MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    BrE dictionaries seem to vary on "enquire/inquire". Chambers gives "inquire" as the principal entry, for instance; but I notice that Oxford Online gives "enquire" as the principal.

    There's certainly a perception that "inquire" is not quite BrE; and the perception seems to be self-fulfilling.

    Those who advocate "enquiry" presumably take OFr enquerre as the root, while the inquirers look back to Latin inquirire (from which the OF itself derives).

    MrP
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    MrPedantic said:
    BrE dictionaries seem to vary on "enquire/inquire". Chambers gives "inquire" as the principal entry, for instance; but I notice that Oxford Online gives "enquire" as the principal.

    There's certainly a perception that "inquire" is not quite BrE; and the perception seems to be self-fulfilling.

    Those who advocate "enquiry" presumably take OFr enquerre as the root, while the inquirers look back to Latin inquirire (from which the OF itself derives).

    MrP

    Yes, I think you have a point. Inquire is certainly far from unheard here - or rather unseen since it would sound the same anyway since we never adopt the US pronunciation of it.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Back when the Fowler (2nd Edition) was published, there was a tendency, which deserves encouragement, to use enquire for ask, and inquire for investigate - as noted by others.

    By now, the OED makes no differentiation.
    The latest Fowler notes the tendency but chooses not to encourage it, and also remarks that the in- forms dominate in AE.
     

    MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Interesting. The 1926 edn says baldly "in- is better". I wonder whether Gowers added the tentative encouragement.

    MrP
     

    DAH

    Senior Member
    USA/California--English
    May I say: I am wondering if there are any vacancies for a job ?


    I would find it odd to hear someone use the word vacancies with respect to seeking employment.

    I would not find it odd if I were to hear someone say:

    Are there any positions available in the company / firm / corporation?

    or

    Are there any positions open in the company?

    or,

    Is the company currently hiring for any open positions?

    Best regards!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    MrPedantic said:
    Interesting. The 1926 edn says baldly "in- is better". I wonder whether Gowers added the tentative encouragement.
    The most recent Oxford version of Fowler is even less prescriptive. It notes, without comment, the BE tendencies described earlier.
     
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