If there's no guilty plea in place, the witness answered tru

AlexanderIII

Senior Member
Russian
Hello, everybody!
This is a scene from a detective film. The action takes place in a court room.
The defence produces a copy of the plea, as entered. The prosecution informs that it was vacated the day before.

Quotation:
Defense (to judge): Are you going to let him (the prosecution) get away with this?
Judge R.: With what? If there's no guilty plea in place, the witness answered truthfully.

Does the last phrase mean that as there was no guilty plea in place the witness' answers are valid? They would have been not so if the guilty plea had been in place (present, actual, not vacated), would they not?
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I can't follow the logic of this. If a person pleads guilty they are as good as admitting the charge, so why should they lie.

    If they plead "not guilty", meaning innocent of the charge, there is no "guilty" plea.

    Does it mean they have pleaded "not guilty" If so, it is more likely that they are not telling the truth, not answering truthfully. Perhaps that is the whole point - the judge was biased in the accused's favour.

    Hermione
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It seems he pled guilty, but then than plea was vacated (vacate - to annul by recalling or rescinding).
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    :confused: So he changed his plea to not guilty? Or is there some state of no plea at all? I still don't see the relevance to the truthfulness of his answers, but thanks anyway.
    :)

    Hermione
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top