If we want people to stay in Venice,they have to have jobs.

< Previous | Next >

kazuhiko fudaba

Senior Member
Japanese
In the article of TIME issued on August 6-13, 2018 : The Tourism Trap; there are sentences as follows.

"You have to know, 5000 people work with the cruise ships," says Mar, who notes that the city council has
asked the government to move large ships from the San Marco basin. "If we want people to stay in Venice, they have to have jobs."

Question) Please explain me what the reporter would convey to us with this bold sentence?

Thank you,

Kazu Fudaba
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "If we want people to stay in Venice, they have to have jobs."

    It's a perfectly understandable conditional sentence, but the connection between the if clause and the results clause isn't tight. If you were very fussy, you might say that the sentence seems to be saying that the precondition for our wanting people to stay in Venice is that those people should have jobs.

    To rephrase,
    If we want people to stay in Venice, we must make sure jobs are available for them.
    If we make sure jobs are available for the local residents, they will stay in Venice.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    For people to (be able to continue to) stay in [i.e. live in] Venice, they have to have jobs.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top