If/Whenever it rains

< Previous | Next >

Honki

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi.

A grammar book of mine paraphrases example (1) with example (2).

(1) If John comes, Mary leaves.
(2) Whenever John comes, Mary leaves.

Question:
Look at sentence (3) below:

(3) If it rains, Tom practices tennis indoors.
(4) Whenever it rains, Tom practices tennis indoors.

Is sentence (3) paraphrased with sentence (4)?

I would like to know about sentence (3).
Will you please give me your coments about sentence (3)?

Thank you in advance.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You can say if something happens (or is the case) to mean whenever it happens — on every occasion on which it happens.

    Both of your examples do that. The constructions are the same. But sentence 4 could be seen as ambiguous:

    Whenever it rains, Tom practises tennis indoors
    • If, when Tom wants to practise his tennis, it’s too wet to play outside, he practises indoors instead :thumbsup:
    • Even if Tom had no intention of practising his tennis, he does so, indoors, every single time it rains :eek:
     

    Honki

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    You can say if something happens (or is the case) to mean whenever it happens — on every occasion on which it happens.

    Both of your examples do that. The constructions are the same. But sentence 4 could be seen as ambiguous:

    Whenever it rains, Tom practises tennis indoors
    • If, when Tom wants to practise his tennis, it’s too wet to play outside, he practises indoors instead :thumbsup:
    • Even if Tom had no intention of practising his tennis, he does so, indoors, every single time it rains :eek:
    Thank you for your comments, lingobingo.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top