(If/whether) you are working (within/in/with) a remote team

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atakeris

Senior Member
Latvian
Hello guys,

Which of words I should use for this sentence. (If/whether) you are working (within/in/with) a remote team, try....

I mean that people who work with or are a part of remote team should try something. When to use "within"?
 
  • Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    "If" is correct. "Whether" is usually used with "or not" e.g. "Whether you work in a remote team or not.." so cannot replace "if" here, as it changes the meaning completely.
    Do not use "within" as it means "inside."
     

    atakeris

    Senior Member
    Latvian
    Definitely "If". As for the latter one, I'd say "in" or "as a part". "With" may suggest you're not a part of it.
    Hi! Thanks! I meant that this sentence should say that that people who work with OR are a part of remote team should try something. Still can't use "within"? By the way, when should I use it?
     

    atakeris

    Senior Member
    Latvian
    "If" is correct. "Whether" is usually used with "or not" e.g. "Whether you work in a remote team or not.." so cannot replace "if" here, as it changes the meaning completely.
    Do not use "within" as it means "inside."
    What is used: "Whether" or "IF" when you have, for example, two option, no "or not" phrases? "(If/whether) you are an entrepreneur or employer working in a company, you should try..."
     

    ośmiornica

    Member
    polski
    People who work with a remote team are not a part of the team. They cooperate with its members. (Thence "with".)
    People who work in a remote team are a part of the team.

    You can't use "within". It has a completely different meaning.
    You could use it in a sentence like: "Try to resolve the issue within your group" - where "within" means "inside, with no help from the outside".


    If you're an entrepreneur or employer...
    Using "Whether" here means "Regardless of whether you are an entrepreneur or employer working in a company (or not), you should try..."
    So, entrepreneurs or employers, and in fact everybody else should try...

    What is used: "Whether" or "IF" when you have, for example, two option, no "or not" phrases? "(If/whether) you are an entrepreneur or employer working in a company, you should try..."
     

    atakeris

    Senior Member
    Latvian
    People who work with a remote team are not a part of the team. They cooperate with its members. (Thence "with".)
    People who work in a remote team are a part of the team.

    You can't use "within". It has a completely different meaning.
    You could use it in a sentence like: "Try to resolve the issue within your group" - where "within" means "inside, with no help from the outside".


    If you're an entrepreneur or employer...
    Using "Whether" here means "Regardless of whether you are an entrepreneur or employer working in a company (or not), you should try..."
    So, entrepreneurs or employers, and in fact everybody else should try...
    Thanks!
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    [...] Using "Whether" here means "Regardless of whether you are an entrepreneur or employer working in a company (or not), you should try..."
    So, entrepreneurs or employers, and in fact everybody else should try...
    Sorry, ośmiornica, but I can't see that.:confused:

    Atakeris proposed "Whether you are an entrepreneur or employer working in a company, you should try...", and specified that this expressed two options, with no "or not" phrases.

    Your "Regardless of" interpretation would be valid only if the sentence contained "or not", so that {
    you are an entrepreneur or employer working in a company} would be the first option, and "not" would be the second. But there isn't an "or not".

    I suppose that atakeris intended "
    you are an entrepreneur" to be the first option, and "[you are an] employer working in a company" to be the second. If so, then the sentence is fine, except that I would add "an" before "employer"; (its absence may have been what led ośmiornica to read 'entrepreneur or employer' as one single option ...?).

    Actually, atakeris, your terms are a little confusing, because an entrepreneur may equally have a company; also, for a company, the employer is the company (perhaps you meant 'recruiter' ...?). But that's another topic, so if you want to discuss that further it'll need a new thread.

    Ws
    :)
     
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