If you aren't a sight for sore eyes.

tagoot

Senior Member
Japanese
“Well, well. If you aren't a sight for sore eyes. I haven't seen you in ages.”

“A sight for sore eyes” is, according to online dictionaries, a way of saying that you are very pleased to see someone or something. My question is about the rhetoric “If you aren’t ”. This must mean “you are surely so and so”, I suspect.

Is this kind of expression common? If so, could you show me some of the examples?

Thank you in advance. I would also appreciate if you would tell me, if any, mistakes in the sentences herein.
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I suppose it is a cleaned-up variant on I'll be damned/darned if you aren't a sight for sore eyes! Damned/darned are or used to be taboo words in some places. It sounds rather old-fashioned to me.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    This must mean “you are surely so and so”, I suspect.
    I agree.

    Is this kind of expression common?
    I don't think this sort of remark is especially common, but it does exist. WR discourages lists of phrases and synonyms, but I'll offer you one example: Aren't you a vision of loveliness this morning? This is an ironic remark that means "You look pretty bad this morning."

    Cross-posted with Teddy.
     
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