If you ever threw these, your childhood rocked.

Tae-Bbong-E

Senior Member
Korean
Hi
I saw this picture on a humor forum website.
From what I tell, the context is a speaker doesn't know listeners threw these or not.

Q1. I am curious whether this sentence could be right or not.
• If you ever threw these, your childhood rocked.


Q2. In order to express conjecture, Should I say this as below? Because the original sentence "your childhood rocked" sounds to me more affirmative.
• If you ever threw these, your childhood maybe/perhaps/probably rocked.


Q3. Let's say the speaker already knows the listeners didn't throw them. In that case, the sentence should be re-composed as below, right?
• If you ever threw these, your childhood would rocked.



PS: a screen dump.
1623417542793.png
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You can’t really rephrase something like this. “Your childhood rocked” means that “you obviously had a great childhood” – but it’s just a typical caption for a picture posted in social media to get a conversation going. It doesn’t actually make much sense.

    • If you ever threw these, your childhood maybe/perhaps/probably rocked. :confused::thumbsdown:
    • If you ever threw these, your childhood would rocked. :cross: (I expect you mean would have, or must have, rocked?)
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Q2. In order to express conjecture, Should I say this as below? Because the original sentence "your childhood rocked" sounds to me more affirmative.
    • If you ever threw these, your childhood maybe/perhaps/probably rocked.
    The original is more affirmative. Your childhood did rock. You can reduce the level of assertiveness by saying "might have rocked" or "probably rocked", but this ruins the point of this sort of image/slogan. It is meant to be assertive (and probably provocative).
    Q3. Let's say the speaker already knows the listeners didn't throw them. In that case, the sentence should be re-composed as below, right?
    • If you ever threw these, your childhood would rocked.
    It doesn't work. If the speaker knew that other people hadn't throw them, then this puts it into the realm of a type 3 conditional: "If you had ever thrown these, your childhood would have rocked". While this may be grammatical, it doesn't fit the situation at all, and the original sentence would be used even when the speaker/writer is certain that none of their audience had ever actually thrown them.

    For anyone who doesn't recognise what the picture is of, they are fun snaps or throw bangers (and many other names besides), and Wikipedia has a page on them here: Bang snaps - Wikipedia
     
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